Jacked Up Shelter Staff Charged with Cruelty in VT

Warning:  This is some disturbing shit.

In February 2016, the Vermont Department of Agriculture reportedly inspected a 16 year old cat shelter in Chester called Webster’s House and approved the facility for re-licensing.  In April, a local paper reported that Webster’s House was being evicted by its landlord, forcing the shelter to find homes for its 39 cats.  And:

In an unrelated situation, after a monthlong investigation, Chester Police have sent a report to the State’s Attorney’s office following a complaint of animal cruelty at Webster’s House.

At that time, shelter manager Mary Donaldson characterized the complaint as coming from “a disgruntled former volunteer who complained about the cats not getting proper medical care.”

This week, Donaldson and the vice president of the shelter’s board, Jessica “Remi” Fecteau, were charged with animal cruelty and lying to police. Both women are still living at the now-closed shelter and have pleaded innocent.

About that so-called disgruntled vol and lack of medical care:

The investigation started when one volunteer, Crystal Losee, a local nurse, was told not to go into the bathroom at the shelter and found a dead black cat in a bucket of water.

[…]

Crystal was told that they could not take the cat to the vet because of a $4,000 bill they already owed.”

Donaldson and Fecteau had allegedly been drowning sick cats in lieu of getting them veterinary care. And no, you’re not out of the woods yet:

Losee told police Donaldson had told her that “the cat had asked Mary to drown him but she just couldn’t do it so Remi did.”

“Remi told her that after the cat was done fighting, the cat apologized to Remi.

[…]

In addition, people at Webster’s House believed in “soul jumping” between the dying cats and the healthy cats, and that Donaldson told another volunteer that one of the cats was “destined to die to be reborn again.”

Court records reveal what appears to be a boatload of crazy-pants:

There were sworn statements from Donaldson and Fecteau, as well as others associated with the now-closed shelter, and it painted a picture of a deteriorating situation at the shelter and shelter volunteers endorsing “body jumping” to transfer the soul of a sick, dying cat into a healthy one.

At one point in December, there were an estimated 70 to 80 cats at the shelter, many of them sick. When the criminal investigation began in January, the number of cats was about half that number.

A state inspector noted the earlier cat population at 80, as did Ann Eddy of the Springfield Humane Society, who also counted about 80 cats, with sick and healthy cats intermingled.

So Webster’s House was drowning sick cats and kittens in order to transfer their souls into the bodies of healthy cats. At the same time, they were housing the sick cats, of which they reportedly had many, with the healthy cats which would obviously result in the healthy cats becoming sick and thereby guarantee a constant supply of souls for the drowning buckets.  Nice bananas system.

By the way, the Rutland Herald reports that Fecteau now works at a mental health facility.  So there’s that.

The lying to police charges likely stem from the various stories Donaldson and Fecteau allegedly told police when asked about the drownings.  They tried everything from “never happened” to “must have drowned in the water dish”.  And when volunteers from area shelters – at Webster’s House to take some of the cats for rehoming before they were evicted – found a freshly drowned cat, Donaldson tried playing the Bitch Set Me Up card:

But the afternoon’s events took a turn for the worse when humane society volunteers found a dead cat, wrapped in a plastic bag, floating in a bucket of water in back of the building. The bucket was covered by a litter box, weighed down by a large rock.

When volunteers confronted Mary Donaldson, the Webster’s House manager about the dead cat, she started yelling that it was a “plant,” and that it wasn’t one of her cats. She refused to look at the cat.

Aaaaaaaaanyway, the Vermont Department of Agriculture has regulations which shelters are required to meet.  A snippet from those regs:

vtwelfareregs

Portion of Vermont’s animal welfare regulations

I will grant you the state inspector might not have known about the soul jumping wackiness because maybe all the Webster’s House peeps were like Ix-nay on the cray-cray while the inspector was around. And maybe he didn’t think it was weird to see water buckets covered with litter boxes and weighed down with rocks. But the inspector would presumably have noted the missing cats, the sick cats housed with the healthy ones and the lack of veterinary care. The last two are clear violations.  So I guess I’m wondering:  How the fuck did the state wave this crackass horror show through for 16 years?  And what is going on at the other state licensed shelters in Vermont?  Can somebody lose their job now, please?

(Thanks Clarice.)

 

Florida ACO Under Investigation After Details of Disturbing Bird Killings Emerge

So this happened.

On February 27, 2016, Hillsborough Co deputies raided a cockfight in progress.  A dozen men ran off, abandoning “numerous dead and live caged chickens”, and no arrests were made. ACOs from the county pound were called in to kill the roosters.

Yay, we’re saved.  *Four seconds later*  Oh FML.

Hillsborough Co pound manager Morgan Woodward apparently sat ACO Sgt. Steve Scanlon down before sending him to the site.  He was supplied with sodium pentobarbital and needles and told not to kill the birds by sticking them in the brain.  Why such a conversation was necessary – well, readers can draw their own conclusions.

According to [Hillsborough Co pound director Scott] Trebatoski, county policy is that roosters should be euthanized with an injection of sodium pentobarbital into the body cavity. The county generally tranquilizes the birds first.

Gee, that’s generally nice.

Upon arrival at the scene of the raid, ACO Scanlon apparently told his staff to stick the birds in the brain. When word got out, the county investigated itself. From a taped interview conducted in connection with the investigation:

“The only thing that I violated ma’am, was I violated our county policy. I did not treat any rooster in a cruel manner,” Scanlon [said].

Scanlon admitted that the method utilized to euthanize (injecting sodium pentobarbital in the back of the head) was the wrong method.

Before we get too far down the rabbit hole here, I guess it needs to be clarified that jamming a needle of Fatal Plus into a bird’s brain is not a method.  There is no such thing as – uh, brainsticking.  He’s making it sound as if he didn’t have a uniform clean for work so he wore street clothes.  Uniforms and street clothes are both actual clothes.  Heartsticking, when performed on an animal already rendered unconscious via drugs, is a recognized method of animal killing.  Brainsticking is a thing made up, presumably by some horrible person, in order to (and I’m guessing here) inflict extreme pain while killing an animal.  ACO Scanlon’s claim that he did not treat any rooster in a cruel manner would have to be false considering the suffering every one of those birds would have endured after having a needle jabbed in his head.

ACO Scanlon has been placed on desk duty while the county continues to investigate itself.

(Thanks Clarice.)

One Dog Dead, Two Others Injured as Adopter Selects a Pet

Montgomery Co in Texas is investigating itself to determine how one of its off duty sheriff’s deputies visited the county shelter to adopt a dog and ended up allegedly beating three dogs with a two-by-four in the back before having his adoption processed out front.  (You probably want to go back and re-read that so I’ll pause for a moment here.)

The Courier of Montgomery Co reports that on Saturday, the MCSO deputy and his family were in the shelter’s exercise area with three dogs, including a friendly male pitbull mix named Rock who was reportedly a staff favorite.  There was apparently no shelter staff supervising the family.  Not saying the guy got special treatment because he was a sheriff’s deputy but, unless the staff is totally lax with everyone who comes to visit, it seems like a possibility.

rock

Rock at the Montgomery Co Animal Shelter, as shown on the Courier website.

When the three dogs started fighting, the deputy allegedly picked up a board and began beating the dogs.  Rock apparently got it in the head and was left with neurological damage so severe that he had to be euthanized.  The other two dogs are described as “seriously injured” but the county won’t say what their status is.  They’re probably fine, you know.

After the bloodshed, the deputy apparently went up front and got the adoption paperwork processed and took home his new pet.  Not saying the guy got special treatment because he was a sheriff’s deputy but, unless shelter policy states adopters can’t be denied for any reason including leaving a trail of blood from the exercise area to the adoption desk, it seems like a possibility.

Shelter director Dr. Todd Hayden told the Courier he didn’t know why three dogs were in the exercise area together, where the two-by-four came from or who Rock was.  And:

“We are working with the DA and the dog is going to Texas A&M tomorrow (Monday) for a necropsy.”

Right. Because maybe Rock had heartworms or hookworms or earthworms or any other possible thing that his death could be pinned on besides having his skull cracked by a sheriff’s deputy. Not saying the guy is getting special treatment because he is a sheriff’s deputy – well, actually.

As far as how the guy’s adoption was processed and he was given a dog to take home, Hayden offered this:

He said the front desk personnel was unaware of the situation unfolding at the back of the shelter.

Gee, maybe they need to institute an Adopter Carnage Alert system to take care of this little loophole.  Or at least a quick visual inspection to determine the adopter isn’t covered in flecks of gray matter and blood.

Anyway, don’t criticize.  Until the stupid public spays and neuters their pets, I guess we just have to accept.  I can’t wait to find out that Rock had Jelly Head Syndrome or a bum ticker or whatever cause of death that will not be attributable to being Negan’d with a two-by-four.

(Thanks Clarice.)

“Just the worst shit that you’ve ever seen in your life” at OC Pound

California – Remember when Orange Co Animal Care Director and Chief Veterinarian Jennifer Hawkins was crusading for the right to kill a service dog named Karma because dogs are descended from wolves?  Well she’s got more wacky up her sleeve.  Like reportedly killing an adolescent puppy for being “bratty”.  And in response to two scathing grand jury reports which cited filthy conditions causing animals to get sick and “poor management practices and lack of effective leadership” as the root of many of the facility’s problems, Hawkins addressed animal advocates at a public meeting in September:

As for euthanasia practices, the shelter’s director said the policy is to only put down animals that have health or behaviors that are beyond staff’s ability to manage. Euthanasia rates are down to less than 6 percent this year, said Dr. Jennifer Hawkins[.]

Apparently teen puppy brattiness is beyond her staff’s ability to manage.  But reducing the kill rate to less than six percent sounds good, yes?  I mean, if it weren’t a big fat lie:

Of the 2,050 animals entering the county government’s sole shelter in October, 725 were euthanized, according to data from shelter officials. That makes for a euthanasia rate of 35 percent[.]

Ah, I see. Probably a lot of brats in there though.

Then there’s this:

Lake Forest Councilman James Gardner, who is active on animal issues, says the high euthanasia rate is an indicator of major problems with the way Orange County shelters animals.

While the shelter has many documents and policies about how to kill animals, “they have almost nothing on how do you care for animals. Almost nothing on how do you make [them] marketable to the people,” Gardner said.

The documents include advice on how many animals to put on table at a time when killing them, he added. “Just the worst shit that you’ve ever seen in your life.”

How many animalS? What the mother flippin’ pancake?  No animal should be killed in view of another animal, at any distance, never mind on the same table.  What kind of kill room horror show is going on at Orange Co?

When the shelter is killing as many animals as it does, Gardner said, it makes it harder to get volunteers to care for them.

Gosh, ya think?  I can’t understand why there isn’t a line of animal lovers around the block waiting for their chance to hold down animals on the kill table while they watch their buddies getting snuffed.

“Orange County kills animals because they’re scared – honestly, because animals are scared, they’re put to death.”

Look, I am a human being, thousands of miles away from the Orange Co pound and thinking about that kill room makes *me* scared.  I can only imagine how the animal victims locked up in the place feel.

This month, animal advocates spoke at the Orange Co Board of Supervisors meeting about their ongoing concerns. Advocates say the shelter manipulates data to give the appearance of a lower kill rate, e.g. counting the killing of an entire litter of kittens as one animal. Hawkins tried giving advocates the silent treatment at the meeting:

There was no response from county staff to the claims. Hawkins was watching the comments in the audience, but did not respond. Her spokeswoman didn’t have further comment when asked about the claims after the meeting.

The following day, Hawkins released a short statement saying her agency will be complying with a directive from county supervisors to respond to the claims by an unspecified date.

The county has previously stated that it’s not management’s fault that morale is low among shelter staff – it’s those pesky animal advocates who keep speaking up and demanding transparency and the implementation of proven lifesaving methods and yadda yadda.  I look forward to the next non-response at an unspecified date.  Meantime, go Team Pesky.

(Thanks Clarice.)

San Diego Co Pound Volunteers Go Public with Concerns

Dog ID #1683976 pictured on the County of San Diego Animal Services website.

Dog ID #1683976 pictured on the County of San Diego Animal Services website.

More than a dozen current and former volunteers with the County of San Diego Animal Services recently shared some concerns with The San Diego Union-Tribune. Among the volunteers’ complaints are needless killings, poor conditions, and retaliation against volunteers who speak out. The allegations mirror some of those made in lawsuits filed by former vets at the facility.

Former pound volunteer Bonnie Kutch quit after years of service and now volunteers with a different shelter. She says of the county pound:

“They were euthanizing perfectly good dogs to make space for other dogs coming in, and not devoting enough effort to getting the existing dogs adopted,” she said.

Additional problems noted by the group of vols:

Not only are officials too quick to put down pets, volunteers say, they resist practices that could lead to more adoptions, such as opening on Sundays like many shelters do so more animals can be adopted out at a time convenient to the public.

The volunteers say many shelter animals languish in cages for days or even weeks at a time without walks, making them “kennel crazy” and lessening their chance to be adopted.

Vols who asked if they could walk dogs say they were told to wash dishes instead or were kicked out.

Longtime pound director Dawn Danielson killsplained all the things to the Union-Tribune, including claiming that the county has maintained a 0% kill rate for dogs deemed healthy and friendly for the past 6 years. (Never you mind about the 6600 pets killed last year. They were all unhealthy and unfriendly, it says so right here in this note I just typed.) And as for those pesky vols wanting to get dogs out of their cages for walks, this ain’t no doggie day spa:

“It’s nice to get the dogs out, but it’s not required,” Danielson said. “We want them to be able to urinate and defecate in their kennels” because it helps prevent infections.

Right. Ask anyone in the business of trying to prevent infections. They’ll tell you the first thing you want to do is shit on the floor you eat off of.  That’s Hygiene 101 right there.

She said her priority with adoptable dogs is to promote “kennel enrichment,” spending quiet time with the animals inside their cages so they learn to be calm when potential adopters arrive.

Quiet time – good one.  I imagine the line to sign up for squeezing into cages with unexercised shelter dogs so they can jump on you with their poopy paws while pleading “Let me OUT!” in the most dramatic way they can manage is probably super long.  Any vols still have their front teeth?

Anyway, the director isn’t asking for much:

“All we ask of our volunteers is to follow the rules and to work with us and follow our philosophy.”

The philosophy apparently being Suck.  And Kill.  And also Suck.  Who wouldn’t want to get on board with that?

(Thanks Clarice and Teresa for the link.)

Wait.

Portion of a job listing on an HSUS website.

Portion of a job listing on an HSUS website.

If you were looking at job listings on the HSUS magazine website, saw this one for a PETA policy director and got all excited to apply, you are going to have all the disappoint.  First off, you won’t be finding homes for 6 – 8 million animals each year.  Possibly 6 or 8 animals, but I wouldn’t count on it.  Secondly, your new employer doesn’t actually find homes for homeless pets – they kill them, even going so far as to collect them from shelters and veterinarians in other states.  Sometimes they stalk owned pets right there in Virginia, wait until the owners leave for work, then steal the pets for killing.  A small percentage of the animals PETA logs in each year get transferred to other facilities which also kill pets but most are killed at the PETA facility or in the van on the way there.  And lastly, I sure hope you don’t like pitbulls even a teensy bit.  Because awkward.

But at least the tech posting the ad online has a sense of humor, placing it alongside a link to “The Flip Side of Fatigue”.

Alex, I’ll take Places to Work When You Have Zero Fucks Left to Give about Animals.

(Thanks Nathan for the link.)

WA Shelter Director: Public Too Dumb to Get Weather, Too Irresponsible to Have Pets. Also: Why Doesn’t the Public Like Me?

inoriteThe director of the Tri-Cities Animal Shelter in Pasco, Washington is saying things again.  This time, pound director Angela Zilar blamesplains to KEPR why the facility typically sees an increase in stray dog intake at this time of year:

“As soon as the weather starts to change, people that have all of these outdoor dogs that they wanted to keep as outdoor pets, they realize that maybe it’s going to be too cold for them.

They tend to start to get rid of them because what was easy for them possibly for the summer is now going to be different or problematic for them for the winter,” said Zilar.

The second reason being the start of the hunting season.

“They determine they’re not going to be a hunting dog so the rise in hunting breeds goes up because now they don’t want these dogs because now they don’t work for what they want them for,” adds Zilar.

The third reason… the agricultural industry.

“The workers have animals when they come to the Tri-Cities- they tend to get animals- and then when they leave they can’t take them with them,” said Zilar.

Shorter: The pound takes in more stray dogs in September and October because the public is too stupid to understand how seasons work, hunters suck and so do the Mexicans.

Smarter: If you know that your facility is going to see an increase in stray dogs in the fall, prepare for it. Be proactive. If people who have outdoor dogs in your area typically abandon them when the weather turns colder due to lack of resources, reach out to them while it’s still warm. Apply for grants and ask for donations so you can supply those in need with appropriate winter housing materials for their dogs. Educate owners whose dogs are not good candidates for being housed outdoors year round about alternatives while it’s still warm.

Engage the members of the hunting community in order to build a relationship with them so that they aren’t turning unwanted dogs loose in the woods every fall instead of utilizing humane rehoming alternatives. Educate hunters about these alternatives during your “Free nail trims for hunting dogs” weekend and other outreach events.

Seasonal workers are most likely not buying dogs. They are taking in strays in need of homes, even though they themselves only have a temporary home to offer these pets. They are sorta doing your job for you. Reach out to them. Offer free spay-neuter and vaccinations (using grant money and donations) to their temporary pets so the population doesn’t increase and remains free of diseases which are a serious threat in the shelter. Make yourselves the good guys. Educate the workers on humane options for rehoming long before the end of the agricultural season. Keep in touch. Let them know you are there to help and, if a shelter of last resort ends up being needed, that’s your job. They should feel welcome to turn to the shelter instead of abandoning the animal.

It sounds like a large number of people in the community think that pets are better off on the streets than at the Tri-Cities shelter. That is a problem. And it’s Angela Zilar’s job to fix it. Instead, she pours gasoline on the fire:

Gabby is a stray dog who just gave birth and was abandoned in a Pet Smart parking lot.

“They are trading her in for a younger generation they probably kept the puppy and now don’t want her,” said Zilar.

Wow. Apparently Gabby came with a backstory pinned to her collar. Or she can talk.

You know who abandons a dog in the Petsmart parking lot? Someone who thinks that people who love animals will see her and hopefully care for her. And obviously that’s not what people think of the Tri-Cities pound. Which again, is a problem.

Angela says they haven’t turned anyone away in the last four years and encourage owners to come in and ask for help when they don’t know what to do with their pet.

I guess I’ll just go with lol on that one. This from the lady who threatened to prosecute owners who surrender their pets to her facility and who blames the community for the many failings of that facility. Sure, walk into my parlor.

(Thanks Mary for the link.)

MO Shelter: Rescues Down, Adoptions Sluggish, Killings Up, Director “Happy”

The city of Chillicothe, MO contracts the Livingston Co Humane Society (LCHS) for animal control services.  LCHS manages the Forest O. Triplett Memorial Animal Shelter, aka the Chillicothe Animal Shelter, which is run by Lesley Patek.

In 2014, the number of dogs and cats transferred from the Chillicothe shelter to rescue groups dropped markedly from the previous year:

In 2013, 276 dogs were sent to rescues, and in 2014 158 dogs went to rescues.

[…]

Rescued cats decreased from 10 to zero[.]

Adoptions remained stagnant while cat intake numbers increased.  Cat killings also increased in 2014 with Chillicothe killing 64% of its cats.  In summary, a dismal performance for the year which any shelter director should be working furiously to turn around for fear of losing her job, if nothing else.  But:

Lesley Patek, shelter guardian, said she is happy with the numbers. “I think we do an excellent job, but we can’t save the world,” she said.

[…]

“We had to put down litters and litters of kittens this year,” Patek said.

[…]

[The killing of pets at Chillicothe] is no fault of the animal’s or of the animals shelter’s, but more so a fault of irresponsible animal owners, Patek said.

If you can’t own it, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it – and this person clearly can’t own it.

I checked the facility’s website to get some insight into the excellent job they do there.  Chillicothe doesn’t disclose what they charge to adopt pets but it sounds like adoption fees are set on a whim:

A pet’s adoption fee will sometimes be higher due to veterinary costs for illness or injury, or due to the fact that it’s a “popular” breed.

There are 8 pets listed for adoption on that page:  3 adult cats, 2 American bulldogs, 1 miniature poodle, 1 papillon mix and 1 chihuahua mix.  I’m guessing the cats all had vet expenses and the dogs are all “popular” breeds.  New pets were last added to the listings on October 10, 2014.  They’re doing the best they can, probably.  I hate that the irresponsible public keeps forcing them to kill animals instead of marketing them for adoption.  And we all know why there are no kittens for adoption at a place that kills “litters and litters of kittens”:  irresponsible pet owners.

Potential adopters are required to sign a contract which states that the adoption fee isn’t really an adoption fee but rather a “gift” so they can’t get their money back if they return the pet.  And the adopter will be required to return the pet at any point during the pet’s life if someone from LCHS conducts an inspection and determines “the animal’s condition and/or living conditions is/are unsatisfactory or that I have violated one or more terms and conditions of this contract.”  So you’re not actually buying the pet and your right to keep your family member is subject to the whims of the LCHS representative’s idea of “unsatisfactory”, whenever.

Aaaaaaanyway, excellent job there Chillicothe, doing your best to get animals into homes.  You can’t save the world.  Or even one kitten, apparently.

(Thanks Clarice for the link.)

MI Politician Smears the South as an Excuse for Hiring a Pet Killer

In Leon Co, FL, animal control is run by Andrew Seltz.  On AC’s website, it states that more than 6000 animals are killed every year at the pound.  And there is one of those threats that the killing will continue until magic happens:

Unfortunately, until each citizen commits to preventing their pet from adding to the burden of pet overpopulation, the trend will continue to worsen.

We don’t have to stop killing animals at the pound.  The burden is not on the few of us actually doing the killing.  We are not going to change.  It’s up to the approximately 282,000 residents of Leon Co to change.  And until all 282,000 people meet our demands, the killings will not only continue but will “worsen”.  If you don’t like it, you can go… enact legislation, I guess.

This is the shabbiest, shirkiest form of blaming the public for the killings at the local pound.  Not only is Andrew Seltz refusing to accept responsibility for his actions, he is blaming the public he needs to partner with in order to stop the killings and setting an unachievable demand for the community to meet before he’ll consider stopping.

The fact is, most people have already neutered their pets.  Most of those who haven’t neutered them would do so if it was within their financial means.  Ordering this small group to get their pets neutered on pain of more needless shelter pet deaths does not cause free spay-neuter certificates and transportation to vet clinics to magically happen.  We can not neuter our way out of killing.  Any shelter director knows this and given that they do, it’s especially cruel to dangle that carrot in front of the public who is needed to foster, rescue, adopt and donate.  It’s cutting off your nose to spite your face.  Then stomping your face in the dirt.  While killing friendly dogs and cats.

When it was recently announced that Andrew Seltz was leaving Leon Co to take over the Ingham Co pound in MI, a concerned animal advocate contacted county commissioner Kara Hope.  This is the response received from Commissioner Hope:

From: “Kara Hope” <kara@votekarahope.com>
To:
Sent: Tuesday, September 2, 2014 1:54:45 PM
Subject: New animal control director

Ingham County is fortunate to have residents like you who care so much about animal welfare. But I hope that you’ll give Mr. Seltz a chance and reserve judgment until he’s had a chance to go to work here.

As someone concerned with animal well-being, you might know that there is a big cultural difference in how animals are viewed and treated in some areas of the southern U.S. To put it crudely, in some southern communities, animals are viewed as disposable. There is less effort and few resources put into re-homing animals. I’m sure that the statistics you refer to reflect policies that result from the difference in points of view.

And it might ease your mind to know that Mr. Seltz told us during his interview that one of the reasons he wants to return to Michigan is because he found the southern perspective on animals and their value to be troubling.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

Kara Hope
http://www.votekarahope.com
@KaraHope7

Oh hell naw.  Don’t go blaming the south for your decision to bring in someone who kills animals instead of doing his job.  We here in the south love our animals just as much as anyone does anywhere in this country.  Our compassion for lost and homeless animals is not second-class.  Our perspective that animals in need should be sheltered and not killed is based upon the value we place on our pets.  Now if you want to charge the south with having an overabundance of regressive, good ol’ boy appointed shelter directors who keep killing animals because that’s the way they’ve always done it and why change when you can blame the public instead – well, that’s a conversation we can have.  Case in point:  Andrew Seltz.  (By the way, thanks for stabbing us in the back on your way to the top, sir.  Don’t let the door hit you in the ass on your way out.)

While employed in the south, Andrew Seltz blamed his local community for the killings he oversaw at the pound.  If Ms. Hope or anyone else in Ingham Co thinks that’s going to change when he gets there, brace yourselves.  I predict Mr. Seltz will find the unwashed masses just as blamable in Ingham Co as he did in Leon Co.  And he’ll continue killing animals until magic.

My message to Ms. Hope goes for Mr. Seltz as well: If you can’t own it, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it. And don’t expect the south to be your punching bag. We’re all full up on smack-talking shelter pet killers around here so find somebody else to kick around.  Or maybe you could stop looking for whipping boys and start doing your jobs, “to put it crudely”.

Federal Agency Attempts to Scare Escambia Co Commissioners Out of TNR

Ford, part of a maintained TNR colony in AL.  (Photo by Aubrie Kavanaugh)

Ford, part of a maintained TNR colony in AL. (Photo by Aubrie Kavanaugh)

Reform at the long troubled pound in Escambia Co Florida is getting some support from county commissioners.  Specifically, the commissioners had planned to discuss the implementation of a TNR program for the community’s feral cats at its July 24 public meeting.  But on July 23, the US Fish and Wildlife Service sent a nastygram to the commissioners, threatening them with jail if they moved forward with TNR.

Instead, the US Fish and Wildlife Service encouraged the county to continue trapping and killing its community’s cats.  Because that’s what the US Fish and Wildlife Service does:  kill animals.  Last year, the agency killed 4 million animals, in addition to mailing out threatening letters I guess.

The Escambia Co TNR ordinance was tabled until the August 14 meeting so that the county attorney could advise commissioners on what to expect in prison their legal options.

Commissioner Grover Robinson seems like he gets it:

“Clearly what we’ve got isn’t working,” the commissioner said. “We’re killing 5,000 cats a year, and it hasn’t made a dent.” He added that whatever concerns conservationists and public health officials had likely would apply regardless of whether the county moved forward with TNR.

“The whole reason we’re considering this is because we believe it will lead to fewer cats in the long term,” Robinson said.

No more calls, I think we have a winner.

If you live in Escambia Co and would like to voice your support for TNR, the commissioners meeting is at 9am on August 14:

Ernie Lee Magaha Governmental Complex, 221 S. Palafox Place

(Thanks Clarice for the link.)

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