San Diego Co Pound Volunteers Go Public with Concerns

Dog ID #1683976 pictured on the County of San Diego Animal Services website.

Dog ID #1683976 pictured on the County of San Diego Animal Services website.

More than a dozen current and former volunteers with the County of San Diego Animal Services recently shared some concerns with The San Diego Union-Tribune. Among the volunteers’ complaints are needless killings, poor conditions, and retaliation against volunteers who speak out. The allegations mirror some of those made in lawsuits filed by former vets at the facility.

Former pound volunteer Bonnie Kutch quit after years of service and now volunteers with a different shelter. She says of the county pound:

“They were euthanizing perfectly good dogs to make space for other dogs coming in, and not devoting enough effort to getting the existing dogs adopted,” she said.

Additional problems noted by the group of vols:

Not only are officials too quick to put down pets, volunteers say, they resist practices that could lead to more adoptions, such as opening on Sundays like many shelters do so more animals can be adopted out at a time convenient to the public.

The volunteers say many shelter animals languish in cages for days or even weeks at a time without walks, making them “kennel crazy” and lessening their chance to be adopted.

Vols who asked if they could walk dogs say they were told to wash dishes instead or were kicked out.

Longtime pound director Dawn Danielson killsplained all the things to the Union-Tribune, including claiming that the county has maintained a 0% kill rate for dogs deemed healthy and friendly for the past 6 years. (Never you mind about the 6600 pets killed last year. They were all unhealthy and unfriendly, it says so right here in this note I just typed.) And as for those pesky vols wanting to get dogs out of their cages for walks, this ain’t no doggie day spa:

“It’s nice to get the dogs out, but it’s not required,” Danielson said. “We want them to be able to urinate and defecate in their kennels” because it helps prevent infections.

Right. Ask anyone in the business of trying to prevent infections. They’ll tell you the first thing you want to do is shit on the floor you eat off of.  That’s Hygiene 101 right there.

She said her priority with adoptable dogs is to promote “kennel enrichment,” spending quiet time with the animals inside their cages so they learn to be calm when potential adopters arrive.

Quiet time – good one.  I imagine the line to sign up for squeezing into cages with unexercised shelter dogs so they can jump on you with their poopy paws while pleading “Let me OUT!” in the most dramatic way they can manage is probably super long.  Any vols still have their front teeth?

Anyway, the director isn’t asking for much:

“All we ask of our volunteers is to follow the rules and to work with us and follow our philosophy.”

The philosophy apparently being Suck.  And Kill.  And also Suck.  Who wouldn’t want to get on board with that?

(Thanks Clarice and Teresa for the link.)


Portion of a job listing on an HSUS website.

Portion of a job listing on an HSUS website.

If you were looking at job listings on the HSUS magazine website, saw this one for a PETA policy director and got all excited to apply, you are going to have all the disappoint.  First off, you won’t be finding homes for 6 – 8 million animals each year.  Possibly 6 or 8 animals, but I wouldn’t count on it.  Secondly, your new employer doesn’t actually find homes for homeless pets – they kill them, even going so far as to collect them from shelters and veterinarians in other states.  Sometimes they stalk owned pets right there in Virginia, wait until the owners leave for work, then steal the pets for killing.  A small percentage of the animals PETA logs in each year get transferred to other facilities which also kill pets but most are killed at the PETA facility or in the van on the way there.  And lastly, I sure hope you don’t like pitbulls even a teensy bit.  Because awkward.

But at least the tech posting the ad online has a sense of humor, placing it alongside a link to “The Flip Side of Fatigue”.

Alex, I’ll take Places to Work When You Have Zero Fucks Left to Give about Animals.

(Thanks Nathan for the link.)

WA Shelter Director: Public Too Dumb to Get Weather, Too Irresponsible to Have Pets. Also: Why Doesn’t the Public Like Me?

inoriteThe director of the Tri-Cities Animal Shelter in Pasco, Washington is saying things again.  This time, pound director Angela Zilar blamesplains to KEPR why the facility typically sees an increase in stray dog intake at this time of year:

“As soon as the weather starts to change, people that have all of these outdoor dogs that they wanted to keep as outdoor pets, they realize that maybe it’s going to be too cold for them.

They tend to start to get rid of them because what was easy for them possibly for the summer is now going to be different or problematic for them for the winter,” said Zilar.

The second reason being the start of the hunting season.

“They determine they’re not going to be a hunting dog so the rise in hunting breeds goes up because now they don’t want these dogs because now they don’t work for what they want them for,” adds Zilar.

The third reason… the agricultural industry.

“The workers have animals when they come to the Tri-Cities- they tend to get animals- and then when they leave they can’t take them with them,” said Zilar.

Shorter: The pound takes in more stray dogs in September and October because the public is too stupid to understand how seasons work, hunters suck and so do the Mexicans.

Smarter: If you know that your facility is going to see an increase in stray dogs in the fall, prepare for it. Be proactive. If people who have outdoor dogs in your area typically abandon them when the weather turns colder due to lack of resources, reach out to them while it’s still warm. Apply for grants and ask for donations so you can supply those in need with appropriate winter housing materials for their dogs. Educate owners whose dogs are not good candidates for being housed outdoors year round about alternatives while it’s still warm.

Engage the members of the hunting community in order to build a relationship with them so that they aren’t turning unwanted dogs loose in the woods every fall instead of utilizing humane rehoming alternatives. Educate hunters about these alternatives during your “Free nail trims for hunting dogs” weekend and other outreach events.

Seasonal workers are most likely not buying dogs. They are taking in strays in need of homes, even though they themselves only have a temporary home to offer these pets. They are sorta doing your job for you. Reach out to them. Offer free spay-neuter and vaccinations (using grant money and donations) to their temporary pets so the population doesn’t increase and remains free of diseases which are a serious threat in the shelter. Make yourselves the good guys. Educate the workers on humane options for rehoming long before the end of the agricultural season. Keep in touch. Let them know you are there to help and, if a shelter of last resort ends up being needed, that’s your job. They should feel welcome to turn to the shelter instead of abandoning the animal.

It sounds like a large number of people in the community think that pets are better off on the streets than at the Tri-Cities shelter. That is a problem. And it’s Angela Zilar’s job to fix it. Instead, she pours gasoline on the fire:

Gabby is a stray dog who just gave birth and was abandoned in a Pet Smart parking lot.

“They are trading her in for a younger generation they probably kept the puppy and now don’t want her,” said Zilar.

Wow. Apparently Gabby came with a backstory pinned to her collar. Or she can talk.

You know who abandons a dog in the Petsmart parking lot? Someone who thinks that people who love animals will see her and hopefully care for her. And obviously that’s not what people think of the Tri-Cities pound. Which again, is a problem.

Angela says they haven’t turned anyone away in the last four years and encourage owners to come in and ask for help when they don’t know what to do with their pet.

I guess I’ll just go with lol on that one. This from the lady who threatened to prosecute owners who surrender their pets to her facility and who blames the community for the many failings of that facility. Sure, walk into my parlor.

(Thanks Mary for the link.)

MO Shelter: Rescues Down, Adoptions Sluggish, Killings Up, Director “Happy”

The city of Chillicothe, MO contracts the Livingston Co Humane Society (LCHS) for animal control services.  LCHS manages the Forest O. Triplett Memorial Animal Shelter, aka the Chillicothe Animal Shelter, which is run by Lesley Patek.

In 2014, the number of dogs and cats transferred from the Chillicothe shelter to rescue groups dropped markedly from the previous year:

In 2013, 276 dogs were sent to rescues, and in 2014 158 dogs went to rescues.


Rescued cats decreased from 10 to zero[.]

Adoptions remained stagnant while cat intake numbers increased.  Cat killings also increased in 2014 with Chillicothe killing 64% of its cats.  In summary, a dismal performance for the year which any shelter director should be working furiously to turn around for fear of losing her job, if nothing else.  But:

Lesley Patek, shelter guardian, said she is happy with the numbers. “I think we do an excellent job, but we can’t save the world,” she said.


“We had to put down litters and litters of kittens this year,” Patek said.


[The killing of pets at Chillicothe] is no fault of the animal’s or of the animals shelter’s, but more so a fault of irresponsible animal owners, Patek said.

If you can’t own it, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it – and this person clearly can’t own it.

I checked the facility’s website to get some insight into the excellent job they do there.  Chillicothe doesn’t disclose what they charge to adopt pets but it sounds like adoption fees are set on a whim:

A pet’s adoption fee will sometimes be higher due to veterinary costs for illness or injury, or due to the fact that it’s a “popular” breed.

There are 8 pets listed for adoption on that page:  3 adult cats, 2 American bulldogs, 1 miniature poodle, 1 papillon mix and 1 chihuahua mix.  I’m guessing the cats all had vet expenses and the dogs are all “popular” breeds.  New pets were last added to the listings on October 10, 2014.  They’re doing the best they can, probably.  I hate that the irresponsible public keeps forcing them to kill animals instead of marketing them for adoption.  And we all know why there are no kittens for adoption at a place that kills “litters and litters of kittens”:  irresponsible pet owners.

Potential adopters are required to sign a contract which states that the adoption fee isn’t really an adoption fee but rather a “gift” so they can’t get their money back if they return the pet.  And the adopter will be required to return the pet at any point during the pet’s life if someone from LCHS conducts an inspection and determines “the animal’s condition and/or living conditions is/are unsatisfactory or that I have violated one or more terms and conditions of this contract.”  So you’re not actually buying the pet and your right to keep your family member is subject to the whims of the LCHS representative’s idea of “unsatisfactory”, whenever.

Aaaaaaanyway, excellent job there Chillicothe, doing your best to get animals into homes.  You can’t save the world.  Or even one kitten, apparently.

(Thanks Clarice for the link.)

MI Politician Smears the South as an Excuse for Hiring a Pet Killer

In Leon Co, FL, animal control is run by Andrew Seltz.  On AC’s website, it states that more than 6000 animals are killed every year at the pound.  And there is one of those threats that the killing will continue until magic happens:

Unfortunately, until each citizen commits to preventing their pet from adding to the burden of pet overpopulation, the trend will continue to worsen.

We don’t have to stop killing animals at the pound.  The burden is not on the few of us actually doing the killing.  We are not going to change.  It’s up to the approximately 282,000 residents of Leon Co to change.  And until all 282,000 people meet our demands, the killings will not only continue but will “worsen”.  If you don’t like it, you can go… enact legislation, I guess.

This is the shabbiest, shirkiest form of blaming the public for the killings at the local pound.  Not only is Andrew Seltz refusing to accept responsibility for his actions, he is blaming the public he needs to partner with in order to stop the killings and setting an unachievable demand for the community to meet before he’ll consider stopping.

The fact is, most people have already neutered their pets.  Most of those who haven’t neutered them would do so if it was within their financial means.  Ordering this small group to get their pets neutered on pain of more needless shelter pet deaths does not cause free spay-neuter certificates and transportation to vet clinics to magically happen.  We can not neuter our way out of killing.  Any shelter director knows this and given that they do, it’s especially cruel to dangle that carrot in front of the public who is needed to foster, rescue, adopt and donate.  It’s cutting off your nose to spite your face.  Then stomping your face in the dirt.  While killing friendly dogs and cats.

When it was recently announced that Andrew Seltz was leaving Leon Co to take over the Ingham Co pound in MI, a concerned animal advocate contacted county commissioner Kara Hope.  This is the response received from Commissioner Hope:

From: “Kara Hope” <>
Sent: Tuesday, September 2, 2014 1:54:45 PM
Subject: New animal control director

Ingham County is fortunate to have residents like you who care so much about animal welfare. But I hope that you’ll give Mr. Seltz a chance and reserve judgment until he’s had a chance to go to work here.

As someone concerned with animal well-being, you might know that there is a big cultural difference in how animals are viewed and treated in some areas of the southern U.S. To put it crudely, in some southern communities, animals are viewed as disposable. There is less effort and few resources put into re-homing animals. I’m sure that the statistics you refer to reflect policies that result from the difference in points of view.

And it might ease your mind to know that Mr. Seltz told us during his interview that one of the reasons he wants to return to Michigan is because he found the southern perspective on animals and their value to be troubling.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

Kara Hope

Oh hell naw.  Don’t go blaming the south for your decision to bring in someone who kills animals instead of doing his job.  We here in the south love our animals just as much as anyone does anywhere in this country.  Our compassion for lost and homeless animals is not second-class.  Our perspective that animals in need should be sheltered and not killed is based upon the value we place on our pets.  Now if you want to charge the south with having an overabundance of regressive, good ol’ boy appointed shelter directors who keep killing animals because that’s the way they’ve always done it and why change when you can blame the public instead – well, that’s a conversation we can have.  Case in point:  Andrew Seltz.  (By the way, thanks for stabbing us in the back on your way to the top, sir.  Don’t let the door hit you in the ass on your way out.)

While employed in the south, Andrew Seltz blamed his local community for the killings he oversaw at the pound.  If Ms. Hope or anyone else in Ingham Co thinks that’s going to change when he gets there, brace yourselves.  I predict Mr. Seltz will find the unwashed masses just as blamable in Ingham Co as he did in Leon Co.  And he’ll continue killing animals until magic.

My message to Ms. Hope goes for Mr. Seltz as well: If you can’t own it, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it. And don’t expect the south to be your punching bag. We’re all full up on smack-talking shelter pet killers around here so find somebody else to kick around.  Or maybe you could stop looking for whipping boys and start doing your jobs, “to put it crudely”.

Federal Agency Attempts to Scare Escambia Co Commissioners Out of TNR

Ford, part of a maintained TNR colony in AL.  (Photo by Aubrie Kavanaugh)

Ford, part of a maintained TNR colony in AL. (Photo by Aubrie Kavanaugh)

Reform at the long troubled pound in Escambia Co Florida is getting some support from county commissioners.  Specifically, the commissioners had planned to discuss the implementation of a TNR program for the community’s feral cats at its July 24 public meeting.  But on July 23, the US Fish and Wildlife Service sent a nastygram to the commissioners, threatening them with jail if they moved forward with TNR.

Instead, the US Fish and Wildlife Service encouraged the county to continue trapping and killing its community’s cats.  Because that’s what the US Fish and Wildlife Service does:  kill animals.  Last year, the agency killed 4 million animals, in addition to mailing out threatening letters I guess.

The Escambia Co TNR ordinance was tabled until the August 14 meeting so that the county attorney could advise commissioners on what to expect in prison their legal options.

Commissioner Grover Robinson seems like he gets it:

“Clearly what we’ve got isn’t working,” the commissioner said. “We’re killing 5,000 cats a year, and it hasn’t made a dent.” He added that whatever concerns conservationists and public health officials had likely would apply regardless of whether the county moved forward with TNR.

“The whole reason we’re considering this is because we believe it will lead to fewer cats in the long term,” Robinson said.

No more calls, I think we have a winner.

If you live in Escambia Co and would like to voice your support for TNR, the commissioners meeting is at 9am on August 14:

Ernie Lee Magaha Governmental Complex, 221 S. Palafox Place

(Thanks Clarice for the link.)

TX City Manager Says Pound’s Primary Goal Should Be Killing

The website for Aransas Pass, TX describes the city as a “paradise” and promises a number of ideals, all consistent with a no kill community:

We pledge, through a strong sense of teamwork and customer service, to be respectful of individual dignity and rights, to remain fiscally responsible, to ethically and responsively interact with our citizens, to innovate when addressing community needs, and, in doing all that, be an organization in which we are all proud to serve.

But Aransas Pass isn’t a no kill community.  In fact, city manager Sylvia Carrillo appears to envision an all kill community, in direct contrast to every pledge made in the previous paragraph:

“We have, in the last five years…steered away from our mission. Our mission is animal control, and that is controlling the animal population,” she said. “Which means our primary goal should be euthanization. We have not planned accordingly or budgeted accordingly.”

It turns out that the city’s main ACO, Carol Crockett, had set up a Facebook page on her own initiative to network pets at the pound and was adopting them out. Both of these things are obviously problematic as neither is consistent with the mission: killing animals.

And Ms. Carrillo wants more than dead dogs and cats in her Mountain of Things to Roll Around In:

“We strayed from that (mission) to even the point of not putting down opossums and skunks, releasing them at the collection station,” she added.

Oh math.  I suppose that despicable ACO also intentionally avoided stomping ant hills on her way into the office every day. Mission: Inconsistent.

It sounds like the ACO is some kind of weird person who responds with bizarre answers when asked at a public meeting about why she isn’t killing everything, all the time:

“In a public meeting, that [killing] was brought up, and (Crockett) said, ‘I can’t do that every day. I can’t go home and live with myself.’

She must have one of those Abby Normal brains.

Paradise has a 72 hour holding period and no adoption program so it’s 72 hours then kill because as Ms. Carrillo points out, the pound is “not meant to be doggy hotel or kitty hotel.” Ooh – burn on you, fancypants pet hotels – what with all your high-falutin’ not dead pets and such as. In the real world, we kill pets in need, and that’s best done on an arbitrary schedule:

“[W]e’ve strayed away from euthanization. We’ve strayed away from doing what we’re supposed to do on a daily basis,” she said. “It came to my attention recently that we were doing euthanizations probably once a week. If you think about that, 72 hours, and you plan accordingly, you should be euthanizing at least every other day to keep that population down, so that the facility, number one, is not overcrowded.

If you’re not going to kill every day, which really is ice cream and yay and mission-y, at least kill every other day because come on, not doggy hotel.

ACO Crockett has quit her job. The other ACO is currently getting certified to kill animals and the city is advertising for someone to replace Crockett (don’t everyone apply at once). In the meantime, the city will pay an area vet to kill shelter pets.

Note: If you choose to contact Sylvia Carrillo or anyone else in the city of Aransas Pass, please keep your comments respectful and obviously making threats of any kind is never cool.  Shelter dogs and cats have the right to live and open admission no kill communities are a reality.  We have that on our side.  And that is enough.  

I’ve included links in the first quote in the post to various pages and files illustrating how no kill sheltering is consistent with everything Aransas Pass claims its wants to be.  Please feel welcome to share those links with city officials in case someone there feels like walking the walk.

(Thanks Mike for the link.)

Pets Go Missing After Animal Control Gets Involved

Doozie Bean, as pictured on The Evening Tribune's website.

Doozie Bean, as pictured on The Evening Tribune’s website.

Annie Allison and her family have owned their beloved cat Doozie Bean for 9 years. He’s been missing since May 7, when he was reportedly trapped in a neighbor’s yard by the ACO for Hornell, NY. Prior to setting the traps in the neighbor’s yard, Hornell Mayor Shawn Hogan states the ACO was supposed to knock on doors of area homes to alert residents. In addition, any cats trapped are supposed to be held for 5 days in order to give owners a chance to reclaim them. The ACO in this case, Gary Hadsell, appears to have not followed procedures.

After Ms. Allison brought her concerns to Mayor Hogan, the mayor denied any knowledge of traps being set. He says he talked with ACO Hadsell who reportedly admitted losing one of the cats he trapped. The ACO also apparently denied ever trapping Doozie Bean, claiming he has the ability to immediately distinguish feral cats from owned pets based on their behavior in the trap. The article doesn’t say if he also pulls rabbits out of hats or whether he’s available for kiddie birthday parties.

Mayor Hogan says ACO Hadsell has resigned. This too is clear as mud:

When reached for comment on his resignation, Hadsell said, “I don’t believe I did (resign). If you have any questions, call Shawn Hogan.”

Mayor Hogan also says that because of what happened with Doozie Bean, his city is getting out of the trapping business.

In the meantime, Ms. Allison and her family are heartbroken. She continues to search for Doozie Bean, driving around for hours, whistling for him and shaking cat treats out the window.


Blue, as depicted in a screengrab from the WREG website.

Blue, as depicted in a screengrab from the WREG website.

In West Memphis, AR a dog named Blue got spooked during a thunderstorm Saturday night and got lost.  A police officer took him to the West Memphis pound.  When Blue’s owner inquired at the pound Sunday, he was relieved to hear his pet was there.  But Blue’s cage was found empty.  Pound director Kerry Sneed says she personally locked the gate on Blue’s cage Saturday night and that it did not appear that he had escaped on his own.

For several hours Sunday morning, Sneed said there was a window of opportunity for people on the property to steal the dog.

Well gee.  Is that the sort of failure that taxpayers in West Memphis are supposed to accept?  What is being done to actually shelter animals from harm once they arrive at the so-called shelter?  Anything?

The owner, George Johnson, continues to walk the streets, calling for Blue.  He has made his e-mail address public in an effort to get any possible leads on the whereabouts of his pet:

(Thanks Clarice for the links.)

Calling All Cars! Angry Pet Lover in Parking Lot, Talking and Stuff!

We last checked in with the Chester Co SPCA in August 2013.  At that time, the facility was refusing to release its kill stats, abandoning its offsite cat adoption program due to it being a “hassle” despite reports that impounded cats were taken directly from counter to kill room, and importing puppies from other states without obtaining the required health certificates.  Former staffers and volunteers described the Chester Co SPCA as a “kill factory”.

Today, there doesn’t appear to be any progress to report.

A volunteer who had bonded with a dog at the Chester Co SPCA grew concerned after he was placed on a six month quarantine for kennel cough (What the what?) and she found him in a cage covered in filth.  When she expressed her concern to staff, she was told she was not allowed to go into the quarantine area.  Problem solved, eh?

The volunteer scheduled an appointment to meet with the volunteer manager concerning the dog on March 24.  After the meeting took place, the volunteer was told to never return to the Chester Co SPCA.  When she asked why, the only information she was provided was that there had been a sekrit vote.

The vol reportedly went to the parking lot where she met another vol with whom she began a conversation.  During that time, the Chester Co SPCA called the police to have her removed from the premises, claiming she was trespassing.  The officer handed her a letter from the pound making her banishment official and told her to leave the parking lot, which she did.

Apparently calling the police on people trying to help animals is SOP at the Chester Co SPCA:

Monday’s incident is the second time in less than a month that police were called to the shelter because of a dispute between staff and volunteers. On Feb. 22, West Goshen Police were called after an altercation between its executive director, two board members and two volunteers. The two volunteers were also fired prior to that incident, according to police.

No doubt the local police unit is thrilled with the Chester Co SPCA’s trespassing calls against volunteers.  I hope no one in Chester Co is being robbed or assaulted while the Sekrit Vote Club is taking law enforcement resources away from the community.

How do you know when your local pound needs a complete overhaul?  Well, this.  For example.

WA Shelter Director Threatens People Who Use Shelter Services with Prosecution

KEPR in Washington reports that 3 seriously injured dogs were surrendered to the Tri-Cities Animal Shelter within the past week when their owners could not afford to pay for the necessary veterinary care.  When I hear about these types of stories, I am sad for the families who are forced to give up their pets due to financial concerns.  I also feel sad for the animals who, in a time of crisis, are likely confused and possibly depressed as they find themselves suddenly away from home in a strange, stressful environment.  I always hope the shelter has some strategies in place to prevent these types of surrenders whenever possible.

But in cases where that’s not possible, I am thankful the owners cared for the pet to the best of their abilities for as long as they could and when the animal’s needs exceeded their ability to pay, they sought help for the animal. Our shelter system is a safety net for pets who become homeless for whatever reason, regardless of whether their former owner died, became homeless himself or any other circumstance – known or unknown.  This is what shelters are for – to help homeless pets in need, no matter how they became homeless.

This is why I was astonished to read a quote from Tri-Cities Animal Shelter director Angela Zillar implying that the owners who surrendered their injured pets should have killed them:

 “I don’t want to be the person that has to hold a dog while it takes it’s last breath. That’s not my job, that’s not what we’re here for. This is not what we should have to do.”

Right.  But that’s not what the owners should have to do either.  Because these animals have a right to live.  Their owners loved them enough to give them up in order to protect that right.  Serving as a refuge of last resort for animals in need is exactly what you’re there for and what your job is.

Tri-Cities is reportedly getting vet care for the animals but unbelievably, also threatening the owners with prosecution:

Those owners could be facing criminal charges.


Animal control works with the prosecutor to hold owners accountable for potential charges of animal cruelty, abandonment and theft.

Unless the director has evidence the owners intentionally caused the injuries to these animals, I don’t see how any cruelty charges would be applicable.  Abandonment implies they left the animal tied to a tree in the woods when in fact, the article makes clear the pets were surrendered to the shelter due to an inability to pay for vet care.  Theft, I don’t even know.

Surrendering injured animals to the shelter when the owner can’t afford to pay for vet care and has exhausted all options is what we want people to do.  It’s why shelters exist.  Without that safety net in place, we are driving people to acts of desperation such as abandoning the injured animal in a highly visible location in hopes that a Good Sam will take him in and provide the necessary care.  It does not matter one iota how the pet became homeless, it matters only that he is.  And once he is, it’s your job to help him Angela Zillar.  Full stop.

I wonder how many people in the areas served by the Tri-Cities Animal Shelter have seen this article and now believe if their pet ever becomes injured beyond their ability to pay for care, they need to either kill the animal or do something illegal in order to avoid prosecution by animal control.  I hope local taxpayers contact their elected officials and demand that the shelter director stops threatening the public with prosecution and starts doing her job.

(Thanks Mary for the link.)


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