State Investigation Determines Two Injured Cats Left to Suffer at Columbus Co Pound

The troubled Columbus Co pound has received a warning letter from the state of North Carolina indicating that the pound “may be in violation of the North Carolina Animal Welfare Act”.  After receiving a letter of complaint from rescuers, the state investigated and determined that Columbus Co may have violated the portion of the law which requires pounds to either seek veterinary care for sick/injured animals or kill them.  The findings pertain to two cats pulled by rescue groups – one who was left without veterinary care for a week at the pound while suffering from two fractured ribs, a draining abscess, bite wounds all over the body and blood in the lungs:

Portion of warning letter from the state of NC to the Columbus pound.

Portion of warning letter from the state of NC to the Columbus pound.

The second cat was a kitten who was left for several days without treatment at the pound despite having open wounds on his legs and part of his face falling off.  Pound workers characterized the extent of the kitten’s injuries to rescuers as “an old scab” on the leg:

Portion of warning letter from the state of NC to the Columbus pound.

Portion of warning letter from the state of NC to the Columbus pound.

The state is requiring the Columbus Co pound to provide written protocols and additional training to workers regarding veterinary care and assessment of animals. This isn’t the pound’s first rodeo and it hardly seems reasonable to hope that meaningful change will result from the current warning letter. Reform, as usual, is left up to local citizens to force.

(Thanks Arlene and Clarice for sending me this story.)

NC Dog Owner Files Lawsuit for Return of Her Pet Sold by County Pound

Bobo, as pictured on the WRAL website.

Bobo, as pictured on the WRAL website.

A lawsuit has been filed by a dog owner against Cumberland Co and the couple who bought her dog from the county pound, despite all parties knowing the dog had an owner who wanted him back.  The lawsuit provides a detailed timeline of events but I’ll provide a summary.

Bobo the golden retriever wandered away from his home on January 21, was found by a Good Sam and taken to the Cumberland Co pound.  The Good Sam said he would take Bobo back after the mandatory 3 day holding period if no one claimed the dog because he felt certain there was a local owner due to Bobo’s excellent condition and manners.

Meanwhile Bobo’s owner was physically searching for her family’s lost pet and networking with neighbors, including the local fire department.  Through the owner’s efforts, the Good Sam was made aware of her name and address while he was on his way to pick up Bobo from the pound on January 26.  He stopped by the owner’s residence but she was not home at the time.  He left his card and called the pound to advise he was on his way and to provide them with the owner’s name and address.  The staffer he spoke with told him if he didn’t arrive within the next 10 minutes – when the 3 day holding period expired – the dog would be sold to someone else.  The good Sam arrived at the pound 12 minutes later and found a man there in the process of adopting Bobo.  The Good Sam explained again to pound staff that the dog’s owner was known and told the potential adopter as well.  The adopter said he could provide a better home for Bobo than the actual owner and decided to move forward with the adoption, which the staff agreed to process.

State law and Cumberland Co code require pound staff to make reasonable efforts to contact the owner of an impounded pet, which the lawsuit alleges the county did not do.  And:

Like many shelters, Cumberland County gives owners three business days to claim a pet from the shelter. A county ordinance requires that timeline be extended another 72 hours “if the owner is known.”

The lawsuit alleges that the county only held Bobo for the initial 3 day period then ignored information regarding the owner’s identity and sold him improperly.  Bobo’s family is heartbroken and tried to get their dog back without resorting to legal action but both the county and the couple who bought Bobo ignored communication from the family’s attorney.  The couple reportedly stated in an email to WRAL that they had narrowly missed out on some previous attempts to adopt other rescue goldens and so placed their name on the list for Bobo.  They further stated that they could not return Bobo to his family “in good conscience” because it’s not in the dog’s “best interest”.

While the buyers seem to vaguely allude to some perceived lack of fitness upon the part of Bobo’s owners, the county was more specific, and in typical fashion, and put the blame for Bobo’s loss on the family:

“Cumberland County Animal Control followed its procedures in dealing with the stray dog dropped off at the Animal Shelter with no identifying tags or microchip. The impounded animal was not claimed by its owner after the required three-day holding period and no owner’s name or address was provided to the department. The dog then became available for adoption and we followed our procedures for that process.

“It is upsetting to lose a pet and we sympathize with the Davis family. We encourage pet owners to have their animals microchipped. All pet owners should make sure their pets are wearing proper vaccination and identifying tags. Should your pet go missing, contact or visit Animal Control immediately.”

Although it’s not 100% clear to me, it sounds as if the county may be denying the Good Sam provided Bobo’s owner information over the phone within the 3 day holding period and that when he arrived at the pound to provide it again, he was 2 minutes past the holding period and the county was within its legal rights to sell the dog.  And despite the county’s obvious attempt to smear the owners, the worst they could come up with is an implication that the owners failed to have tags on the dog (which is denied in the lawsuit).

It seems obvious what the right thing is here.  It should have been obvious to both the county and the buyer at the time the adoption was being processed.  Cumberland Co killed 63% of the dogs and cats it took in last year so perhaps it’s not surprising to learn that staff failed to do right by a pet in its care.  I don’t know what the buyers’ excuse is except for the fact that they didn’t get some previous rescue goldens they wanted and were apparently determined to get this one, even if he didn’t need rescuing.  The pettiness and mean-spiritedness from both the county and the buyers is shameful.  And poor Bobo has been needlessly separated from his family all these months.

Bobo’s owner is seeking his return in the lawsuit.  If the court rules in her favor, perhaps Cumberland Co will think twice next time about breaking up a family.  One hopes anyway.  Watch this space.

(Thanks Clarice for the links.)

Family Believes NC Pound Illegally Killed Their Lost Cat

Burley, as pictured on the WCNC website.

Burley, as pictured on the WCNC website.

The Caldwell Co pound in NC is a cat killing machine.  In 2014, the pound killed 94% of the 1448 cats it impounded.  The facility’s website states that owners can look for their lost pets on Petfinder (and emphasizes the pound staff does not want owners calling the place).  But when I clicked through to Petfinder, it said no animals were listed.  The website does have 3 cats listed as adoptable but none have photos.  They’re doing the best they can, prolly.

When the family of a lost cat named Burley found out their pet had been impounded by the Caldwell Co pound the day before Good Friday, the staff had already gone home for the long holiday weekend.  Burley’s family went to the Caldwell Co pound when it reopened on Monday to inquire about him and were shown paperwork on 5 cats – 1 of whom matched Burley’s description.  When they went to look at the caged cats, 3 of the 5 cats were missing, including Burley.

Burley’s family believe he was killed by staff at the Caldwell Co pound.  But the director told a local news reporter that he thinks the cat escaped his cage somehow and then the building.  Somehow.  No word on whether the other 2 “missing” cats were also in on this great escape.

Burley’s owners consider him family and believe the people paid to protect him killed him in violation of the mandatory holding period, then fabricated a story to cover up their wrongdoing.  I can’t help wondering about the 1354 cats killed by the Caldwell Co pound last year.  How many of them had owners who wanted them back, just like Burley?  How many were held for the mandatory holding period – is anyone monitoring that?  Where are the other 2 cats who were discovered “missing” along with Burley?  How many owners of lost cats in Caldwell Co suffered heartbreak, never knowing what happened to their pets, and are now contemplating what tragic ends they may have met at the pound?

Caldwell Co taxpayers must demand better from their pound.  As it stands, they are funding a cat extermination facility.

(Thanks Clarice and Arlene for the link.)

Caddo Parish Killing Thousands of Pets, Blaming the Public

The main “service” provided to animals by the staff at Caddo Parish Animal Services in Louisiana is killing:

Caddo took in 8,744 dogs and cats last year and euthanized 6,805, according to data provided by the shelter.

Based on these numbers, Caddo’s kill rate for 2014 was 78%.  That is a staggering number of dead pets.  And you don’t achieve those kinds of numbers without enablers:

“I hesitate to blame the shelter because I see what they are up against.” – Reed Ebarb, Companions of Caddo Animal Services president and member of the Caddo Parish Animal Services Advisory Committee

“The missing component is taking place out in the community where people are having puppies in the backyard. […]  More needs to be done on the community’s end. People need to be more responsible.  Until we overcome that piece we have an uphill battle to fight. We can do everything right and still fall short.” – Caddo Parish Administrator Woodrow Wilson Jr.

Let’s clarify one thing:  When you are killing roughly 8 out of every 10 dogs and cats who come through your doors, there is zero chance you are doing “everything right”.  More likely, you are doing about 8 out of 10 things wrong.  Dead wrong.  But in this safe and comfortable environment, supported by local killing apologists, it’s little wonder the pound’s director takes no responsibility for the killing:

Everett Harris, Animal Services director, said the shelter’s numbers “are at the mercy of the community.”

“We are a community shelter dealing with a community problem,” he said.

An animal is considered property by law, and if an owner turns over the property, the shelter is obligated by law to take it, Harris explained.

File that complaint under WHY YOU ARE THERE, SHERLOCK.

I guess everyone who lives in Caddo Parish is the suck, except for the pound workers blamelessly killing more than 500 animals a month because the tyrannical public has the pound under its thumb, wielding its absolute power without compassion.  Also:  there are reportedly puppies in backyards there which is a unique challenge not faced by any other communities anywhere so kill everything, obviously.

(Thanks Clarice for the link.)

Greenville Co Pound: “No Rescue/No Adopt”

Injured dog ID #25277456, wanted by rescue, at the Greenville Co pound.

Injured dog ID #25277456, wanted by rescue, at the Greenville Co pound.

On Tuesday, March 31, an approved rescuer made multiple offers via email to the Greenville Co pound in SC to take dog ID #25277456. This was the response she received from the pound:

On Wed, Apr 1, 2015 at 9:15 AM, petrescue <petrescue@greenvillecounty.org> wrote:

Not available for rescue or adoption.
she had a medical evaluation yesterday and her prognosis is not good.
The vet wrote NO RESCUE NO ADOPTS on her card.
This is the same dog you e-mailed about.

PetRescue
328 Furman Hall Road
Greenville, SC 29609
864.467.3983 (office)
864.467.3294 (fax)
http://www.greenvillecounty.org/acs

The rescuer responded:

Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2015 9:32 AM
To: petrescue
Subject: Re: Another Schnauzer AHHHH, lol

What is wrong with her? We will treat whatever needs to be treated? What age is she? I will take her no matter what.

Greenville Co pound’s reply:

From: petrescue <petrescue@greenvillecounty.org> Date: Wed, Apr 1, 2015 at 9:34 AM
Subject: RE: Another Schnauzer AHHHH, lol

She cannot be rescued, per the vet.

PetRescue
328 Furman Hall Road
Greenville, SC 29609
864.467.3983 (office)
864.467.3294 (fax)
http://www.greenvillecounty.org/acs
petrescue@greenvillecounty.org

The rescuer did not give up and wrote to the pound again:

Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2015 10:49 AM
To: petrescue
Subject: 25277456 URGENT!

I need to know what is wrong with this dog and if she needs medical care right away?
If the vet thinks she is bad off healthwise I want to get 2nd opinion from my vet. If it is the dog being scared issue, I will take her even if she is biting, we have that form for me to sign. Please do not let this dog be put to sleep without me knowing it, let me know what is going on. I am just worried about her that is all. I am ready and willing to help, I am not trying to cause a stir, I just want to help.

She received a response from the pound’s vet:

On Wed, Apr 1, 2015 at 11:07 AM, petrescue <petrescue@greenvillecounty.org> wrote:

This dog has severe back issues. There are several collapsed disc spaces in the lumbar region and possibly in the thoracic region as well. There may be some calcified disc material in L3-L4 space. There is bridging spondylosis along a good portion of the spine as well as a likely fracture at the base of the tail causing chronic changes in that region. She has significant pain in her lumbar spine and is unable to walk normally. She has been started on pain management and steroids to try and reduce the inflammation in her spine. She is currently still on her stray hold and she is not available for adoption or rescue at this time. If after her stray hold her prognosis improves on the medication she may be available to an approved rescue.

Assuming she responds to her medication she will need to remain on strict cage rest and steroids for a minimum of 3 weeks. She is likely going to need pain management for the remainder of her life. There is a good chance that, if a disc hasn’t ruptured already, it will soon if she is allowed to run, jump, use stairs, climb, or have any excessive exercise. If she does not improve on her medication she would need a myelogram to determine the exact nature of her spinal disease and develop a treatment plan. Considering the extent of her spinal disease, though, she is unlikely to be a good candidate for surgery. For this reason, if her pain cannot be controlled medically, euthanasia would be her best option.

She will be reevaluated at the end of her stray hold to see if it looks like she could have a good quality of life on pain medication alone or if she will need more extensive diagnostics and care.

Dr. Teri Worl
Shelter Veterinarian
Greenville County Animal Care Services
328 Furman Hall Rd
Greenville, SC 29609

PetRescue
328 Furman Hall Road
Greenville, SC 29609
864.467.3983 (office)
864.467.3294 (fax)
http://www.greenvillecounty.org/acs
petrescue@greenvillecounty.org

The rescuer again pleaded to be allowed to help the dog:

Date: Wed, Apr 1, 2015 at 11:23 AM
Subject: Re: 25277456 URGENT!
To: petrescue <petrescue@greenvillecounty.org>, tworl@greenvillecounty.org

I am willing to help this dog. If euthanasia is her best option than no offense, I would rather be by her side with my vet than her to pass at the shelter. After her stray hold just please let me know we are willing and ready to help this dog. I think no matter the injury, temperament, or health of a dog, if you have someone that is willing to try and not give up the dog you should give them that chance. In my opinion NO ADOPT OR NO RESCUE should never be a option for any animal unless it is actually laying there passing away and you have no other choice. I am going to take this up with Paula Gucker on changing that policy. […] this dog needs someone to fight for her not give up on her!

Someone willing to fight for the dog instead of giving up on her.  Yeah, if only there was some kind of place like that.  A safe haven for lost and homeless animals where they could be sheltered and protected from harm.  Someone should invent that.

(Thank you to the shelter pet advocates who are trying to help this dog.  Please let us know if there are any developments.)

TN Pound Closed, Worker Suspended After Dog Found Alive in Freezer

Note:  You never know how images of a dead animal or a live animal who has been hurt, neglected, or otherwise abused will affect people.  Although I make an effort to avoid these images when possible, I have seen too many in the course of writing this blog.  Some are extremely graphic, others less so.  But for me, that is not the determining factor in how deeply these images affect me and to be honest, I don’t know what is.  It is likely a combination of things relating to the image and things unrelated (e.g. you’re having a bad day and then you see a photo of a pet someone hurt and you find it affects you more than you anticipated).  This is the reason I post warnings whenever I link to images that I think some people may find disturbing.  Because I have no way of judging how much each individual can stomach nor do I know in what context the images will be viewed.  Which is a long way of getting to:  The video linked in the post below may be disturbing to some readers.  Speaking for myself, I’ve seen far more graphic images but this one broke my heart, despite knowing the dog is still alive.  Use your discretion.

***

The Lauderdale Co pound in TN has been shut down by order of the mayor and one worker suspended after a dog was found alive in a freezer by a citizen last week.  The woman who found the dog was reportedly looking for the remains of a different dog when she noticed a vein pulsing on the pet.  She shot a brief video showing the dog’s pulse on his leg.  His body is crumpled up and squished like a dirty rag among the dead pets in what appears to be a chest type freezer.  The woman removed the living dog and shot another short video of him which shows he is extremely weak but his eyes are open.  She took him to a vet for care and named him Asher.  The vet reportedly found no evidence of sedatives or sodium pentobarbital in Asher’s system which led to the suspicion that he was placed in the freezer alive and left to suffer and die.

Asher, as shown on LocalMemphis.com.

Asher, as shown on LocalMemphis.com.

The woman who saved Asher was “too afraid to go on camera” because you know, everyone who works at a shelter is a kind-hearted animal lover and such.  LocalMemphis.com reports the Lauderdale Co pound “has a history of problems which include animal control officers shooting dogs and illegally putting dogs in a gas chamber.”

A rescuer told Fox13 that it’s too much work for pound staff to allow rescue groups to help save pets and “easier to throw an animal in the freezer or the incinerator.”  A woman who has lived across the street from the pound for years says she has witnessed abuse there, including starving dogs forced to cannibalize their kennel mates and caged dogs being sprayed full force with a hose.  No one paid by taxpayers to run the county would speak to the Fox13 reporter but the DA said the county sheriff’s department is investigating an allegation of animal cruelty at the pound.

Lauderdale Co leaders have called an emergency meeting for this afternoon regarding the pound.  There is reportedly someone tending to the animals while the facility is closed.  Assuming that person avoids torturing any pets, it will be a significant improvement.  It’s a low bar.  Hopefully Lauderdale Co leaders can clear it.

(Thank you Clarice and Arlene for the links.)

Arkansas Pound Kills Dog Whose Owner Tried to Reclaim

Muneka and her boy, as shown on the FOX 16 website.

Muneka and her boy, as shown on the FOX 16 website.

Two dogs belonging to Yadria Dorantes jumped their fence and were picked up by Beebe Animal Control on March 13.  Ms. Dorantes says she contacted AC to reclaim her shar pei/lab mix Muneka and her other dog.  Ms. Dorantes says AC told her that because the dogs kept jumping her four foot fence, she would need to put up a taller one before picking them up.  AC reportedly gave her two weeks to get the new fence installed.  Ms. Dorantes spent $1200 to get the much taller chain link fence put up then took her children to the pound to pick up their pets within the two week time frame, as agreed.  Upon arrival, Ms. Dorantes was shown a pile of dead dogs who had been killed at the pound.  Muneka’s body was in that pile.

“The guy told me that I could not get the shar pei back because she was really aggressive and that they were going to put her down. I asked ‘are you going to put her down or have you already?’ and he didn’t say anything,” Dorantes said.

Ms. Dorantes is understandably heartbroken and it’s clear in the video interview with the FOX 16 reporter that Muneka was family.  The tall fence is shown in that clip as well as a neighbor who says that the dogs were friendly.

The city of Beebe released this statement regarding the killing:

“On or about March 13, 2015, Beebe Animal Control personnel and Beebe City Police personnel responded to a report of “at large” dogs at or around the 600 block of N. Fir in Beebe. Two (2) dogs were impounded on that date; one (1) of the dogs was aggressive and both dogs did not have tags and there was no proof that the dogs had required vaccinations. Animal Control personnel were able to locate the owner of the two (2) dogs and that owner has had multiple dogs impounded by Animal Control on prior occasions. At the time the two (2) dogs were impounded on March 13, the owner was given verbal notice that the dogs were being impounded and the owner responded, “…take them.” On or about March 23, 2015, the aggressive dog was destroyed as authorized by the attached Beebe City Ordinance (6.04.15). Before the aggressive dog was destroyed, the owner made no attempt to seek release of this dog. After the aggressive dog was destroyed, the owner appeared and requested release of the second dog, which was granted on conditions that the dog be tagged and properly vaccinated. The owner has still not complied with those conditions as of the time and date of this press release.”

I guess the typewriter must have run out of ink before they got to the “Sorry for your loss” part.  But at least we know the owner is a no-license-no-proof-of-vaccines scumbag who doesn’t care about her pets.  It’s exactly these sort of heartless slackers who come up with $1200 on short notice to save their dogs from the pound.  The city should totally kill their dog, who no doubt was evaluated by a qualified behaviorist and given every opportunity for behavioral modification in an appropriate setting over a period of months.  Also, nice touch with the whole you-can-reclaim-your-beloved-family-member-from-this-pile-of-carcasses.  Stay classy.

(Thanks Clarice for the link.)

Case Update: Former Pound Director Charged with Felony Cruelty

Pete Brock, the recently fired director of the Martin Co pound in NC, has been arrested and charged with felony animal cruelty.  This is in addition to the charge he was already facing regarding alleged threats made to a former co-worker.  The new charge was filed as the result of an investigation stemming from a February 12 euthanasia inspection in which the facility received only one “acceptable” rating and twenty-two “not acceptable” ratings.

On that date, the state inspector found impound paperwork for nine cats.  Although the drug log only showed that six cats were killed, there were eight cat carcasses in the freezer and one cat was in distress in a trap.  ACO Beck explained that then-director Brock had injected the cat with a euthanasia drug before leaving for the day, telling him to check on the cat later.  If the cat wasn’t dead, ACO Beck was to re-kill the cat.  ACO Beck is not certified to kill animals and asked the inspector if she could kill the cat.  The inspector instructed ACO Beck to take the cat to a local vet clinic.  The vet at the clinic determined the cat had been injected with something that failed to kill him.  The cat was re-killed by the vet.  A technician called the state inspector to report on the cat and said that this wasn’t the first time this had happened.

The technician told the inspector that one week prior, ACO Beck had shown up at the clinic “in a panic” with a kitten who had been injected by Brock and left in the freezer overnight.  ACO Beck found the kitten alive in the freezer with icicles on her ear tips, whiskers and fur.  The tech described the kitten as “hypothermic, wobbly, showing signs of neurologic compromise, thin, hungry and had frostbite damage to the eartips.”  The kitten was saved and has been adopted.

Drug logs at the Martin Co pound were either incomplete or non-existent according to the inspector’s report.  Controlled substances were left unsecured, both inside the facility and in Brock’s county issued vehicle.  Brock was allegedly killing trapped cats immediately upon impound with improper documentation.  ACO Beck had never seen Brock sedate an animal prior to killing and trapped cats were being jabbed at random spots on their bodies through the spacing in the wire traps.  The inspector found no euthanasia manuals on the premises nor was there a stethoscope to verify death.

On March 11, the state permanently revoked Brock’s kill license.  That document details the two botched cat killing attempts as well as an incident with a dog at the pound.  The dog was slated to be killed on December 3, 2014 and ACO Beck reportedly witnessed Brock use the county’s tranquilizer rifle to shoot the dog with several darts filled with euthanasia solution.  The dog was in his cage while Brock repeatedly shot him in the shoulder.  After the dog collapsed, Brock went into the run and injected him with more drugs.

And in case anyone was thinking that these taxpayer-financed violent crimes against dogs and cats are indefensible, hold up:

The county manager says they recently started lethal injections on animals after receiving grant funds to do away with the gas chamber.

David Bone says, “This was a new program we started recently, so anytime you start something new, there can be challenges.”

Bone says the State Department of Agriculture came to the shelter for a routine inspection to check on how they put down animals.

He says, “Part of that process was when they found some discrepancy about the records.”

[…]

Bone says, “He’s had a good career, unfortunately these circumstances came up and so we’re dealing with them .”

Ah, circumstances.  Records discrepancy.  Challenges.  And for some additional context, I refer again to the state inspector’s February 12 report, in which she states she met with county manager David Bone to detail her findings:

During this session it was clear that Mr. Bone had not known of any of the improprieties and showed much shock and surprise.

*slow clap*  What a performance.

This is what enabling looks like.  This is why we have animal cruelty happening in our broken shelter system.  This is why re-training, moving to a new building, and juggling numbers do not solve any problems.  We need systemic reform, now.

As for Brock, he is reportedly out on a $500 bond and due in court on March 30.  Watch this space.

(Thanks Clarice for the link.)

Owned Cat Trapped by Police, Taken to Cat Killing Facility

The most recent yearly report posted for Baldwin Co Animal Control facility in Alabama is 2012.  That year, the county took in 2526 cats, killing 2304 of them – a kill rate of 91% for cats.  Clearly killing is the default for cats at the Baldwin Co pound and it is a rare event for any cat to leave the facility outside of a garbage bag.

Kiki, as pictured on al.com.

Kiki, as pictured on al.com.

Tragically, as if there aren’t enough cats already being killed at the facility, the Foley police department traps cats upon request and takes them to the Baldwin Co pound.

Foley pet owner Diana Rohe thought her 10 year old cat named Kiki had gotten lost in January.  She searched the neighborhood for weeks and offered a $1000 reward for Kiki, whom she had rescued as a kitten.  It turns out, Ms. Rohe’s neighbor had complained to the Foley police about cats getting into trash cans and requested that traps be set.  Kiki was caught in one of the traps, taken to the county pound and killed for “erratic behavior” although obviously her chances of being killed there were extremely high, all behavioral considerations aside, since she was a cat.  The neighbor stood by in silence as Ms. Rohe searched for her pet.  Ms. Rohe was unaware that traps had been set on the property.

This week, Ms. Rohe spoke before the Foley city council about the needless killing of her beloved pet:

“My cat lost her life because there is no warning from the city. There’s no kind of sign, there’s no kind of phone call, there’s no notice on the Internet, on a website or something to say, ‘We’re going to be setting traps in your area,'” Rohe said.

Rohe described her cat being “lured and tricked like a little kid with candy.”

[…]

“I’m just telling y’all my life has changed,” Rohe said emotionally. “I’m devastated over what she went through … They put her to sleep because she was so traumatized.”

Foley police chief David Wilson said that the officers will start putting up signs to notify residents when they have set traps for cats:

“I’ve apologized to her that her Kiki was put down like that,” he said. “You couldn’t have made this up. And we’re going take measure so it doesn’t happen again, at least like that.”

Maybe not exactly like that, but the pound’s statistics show that any cat brought in will most likely be killed.  Putting up trapping signs for cat haters to rip down won’t force the county shelter to start doing its job.  As it stands, the county is operating little more than a pet killing facility with regard to cats and the city of Foley should either demand that cats actually be sheltered or terminate the relationship with the pound.  If Foley insists on trapping cats, the city has an obligation to take them to a safe place and the Baldwin Co pound is not safe for cats.

(Thank you Anne for sending me this story.)

Martin Co Pound Director Fired and Arrested

Martin Co Animal Control on Landfill Road in Williamston, NC is open from 8:30 – 10:00 am and 3:30 – 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday.  The website says, with a straight face:

The Martin County Animal encourages animal adoption. […] Please come by during the hours above to consider pets for adoption.

There do not appear to be any listings for lost or adoptable pets on the website.

In 2013, Martin Co AC took in close to 1400 dogs and cats, killing 67% of them. That year, Henley “Pete” Brock was promoted by the county from Lead ACO to Director of the pound.

On February 9, 2015, Brock allegedly attempted to kill a cat then placed the pet in a freezer. The animal was found alive the next morning. Three days later, Brock allegedly attempted to kill another cat then left the facility. An ACO found the pet still alive and brought the animal to a vet where he was re-killed. The first cat is reportedly still alive. The NC Department of Agriculture has suspended Brock’s kill license while it investigates.

An agriculture department spokesman said they have also notified other authorities of possible missing narcotics at the animal shelter. The Martin County Sheriff’s Office referred questions back to the county manager on whether they were also conducting an investigation.

Based upon Brock’s alleged failure to lock up and account for the controlled substances used to kill animals as well as the two botched attempts at cat killings, Martin Co fired Brock. Sounds like he took it well:

WITN News has learned that Brock was arrested today by deputies on a charge of communicating threats. The victim was a former co-worker of Brock’s, according to deputies.

Brock has bonded out of jail. I hope once the state’s (and possibly the county sheriff’s) investigation is complete, all applicable criminal charges related to Brock’s activities at the pound will be brought. Right now, he is not charged with any animal-related crimes.  And I’m not holding my breath while waiting.

Respectful letters demanding a complete and transparent investigation into all possible criminal activities at the Martin Co pound may be sent to:

Do better, Martin Co.  On everything.

(Thanks Clarice and Lisa for the links.)

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