OH Shelter Clings to Its Terrible Behavioral Assessments and Its Fatal Plus

SideeyeThat asinine plastic hand is waving more shelter dogs into the kill room – this time at the Franklin Co Dog Shelter in Ohio.  Just how many dogs are being killed because they don’t wag their tails and exclaim, “Thank you sir, may I have another?” when someone jabs them in the face with a fake hand on a stick while they are trying to eat is a matter of dispute.  Volunteers say way too many.  The assistant director says zero. Then there are the numbers:

Last year, [Franklin Co] recorded an 82 percent success rate of adopting, rescuing, or reclaiming dogs.
[…]
In March alone, 139 [dogs] were euthanized. Debbie Finelli, Assistant Director Franklin County Dog Shelter says that’s because 52 out of the 140 dogs that came in were terminally ill or terminally injured. “I couldn’t do anything for those,” she explains.

If I’m reading this correctly, 140 dogs came in and 139 were killed in March. Of the 139, 87 were apparently either healthy or possibly had some treatable minor illness/injury. So she “couldn’t do anything” for 52 of the dogs and didn’t do anything, except killing, for the other 87. BUTOFCOURSE:

“I don’t like to euthanize. (I) wish I never had to, but we’re an open shelter (and) have to take every dog that comes in here.”

*drink*

Several shelter vols who spoke with the local news on condition of anonymity for fear of retribution (stellar indicator of a progressive shelter) say that many dogs are needlessly killed after failing to bow to the Fake Hand of God. Which has mercifully declined in use over the years:

The ASPCA tells 10TV “We have determined that food guarding assessments are not useful tools for shelter dogs because they are not reliable predictors of overall behavior in the home.”

The Franklin County dog shelter uses the ASPCA guidelines to run its shelter, but says it has no plans to remove the assessment.

“Maybe when a new director comes in they’ll have the ability to take that out of the behavioral assessment, but at this point, I don’t have the authority to take it out of the assessment, Finelli explains.

Really?  Is that the hill you want to die on?  I wonder what is supposedly necessary for Franklin Co to bring itself into compliance with the guidelines it claims to follow – Act of Congress? Presidential executive order? Directive from a burning bush?

Soooooo we follow the ASPCA guidelines, except for the one that would prevent us from needlessly killing good dogs, which is mostly who we kill, but we don’t like to kill but we kill as many as we take in but we have an 82% save rate.  I guess.

Franklin Co needs to stop putting healthy, friendly dogs in the dumpster and put its pokey-in-the-face-stick there instead.

(Thanks Clarice.)

Nobody Wants These Animals: NYC Edition

What would you be willing to do in order to avoid killing a shelter pet?  And let me be clear – in this hypothetical, you are getting paid to do whatever it is your answer is going to be.  So set aside all those obstacles that sometimes hinder us in life when we are trying to save animals.  This is your job.  What would you be willing to do?

I’ll go first:  I would be willing to do just about anything to avoid killing a shelter pet.  The first thing I’d probably do is check the pet’s records to see if any interested adopters or rescuers had placed their names on the animal.  If someone had in fact applied to adopt the pet, I’d call that person.  If he left two numbers, or six or sixteen, I’d call all of them.  If he left an email address, I’d get typing, in addition to the phone calls.  If his mailing address was available, I’d drop a note in the mail if I didn’t receive a prompt response to the calls/emails.  If he put down his place of employment on the application and I hadn’t had any luck reaching him, I might go there, depending on the type of business.  Carrier pigeon, smoke signals, skywriting – I’m not ruling anything out.  And while I wouldn’t quickly give up on the adopter, I’d be trying all sorts of other things in the meantime:  posting an online plea for a temporary foster to buy an extra day, reaching out to rescuers/animal advocates/person I sat next to on the bus once/lady who made eye contact with me at the grocery store/etc.  Like I said, just about anything.

I’m guessing most readers here might give similar type answers.  But if your answer is:  I wouldn’t be willing to do one damn thing even though it’s my job and if I get called out on it later I’d just lie, you might like to apply at NYC ACC.  You know, to be around your own kind.

promise

Promise, as shown in a video posted on Facebook.

This gentleman posted on social media that he had applied to adopt a dog named Promise from NYC ACC.  He was told he’d be contacted upon approval of his application.  While waiting, he tried to check back with the facility several times but couldn’t get anyone on the phone.  Finally he emailed and received a response:  NYC ACC had killed Promise because she had a cough.  They said someone had left him a voicemail but he says that just isn’t true:

I left both of my cell numbers, my girlfriend’s number, my mom’s number, 2 references complete with contact information. I have no missed calls, no voicemails on either of my phones… No email to ensure your transmission was received. No effort whatsoever. Shame on you Animal Care Centers of NYC. You killed my dog for fucking Kennel cough. She deserved better than that. You had a pending application and an eager recipient, yet you took her life anyway.

Her bed arrived last week, she’ll never get to sleep in it. Her new collar with her name on it was on the way, she’ll never get to wear it.

[…]

RIP Promise. We loved you already.

Well done NYC ACC.  You must be proud.  Same shit, different day.

NYC ACC says there is no such thing as no kill.  (There is, of course.)  I heard there was no such thing as monsters but apparently that ain’t true either.

(Thanks Nathan.)

Former Director Who Killed Shelter Pets “For Fun” Goes to Jail. Let’s Party.

Mary Jo Frazier was allegedly killing animals for personal enjoyment during her 18 years at Boulder City AC in Nevada. Co-workers report she killed animals before the mandatory holding period had expired to keep the shelter empty. And because: yay killing.  She faced a judge this week on animal cruelty charges:

An 8NewsNOW I-Team first reported, an affidavit against Frazier alleges 91 instances of unusual animal deaths at the shelter and more than 1,200 suspicious cases.
[…]
“There is no doubt that these actions occurred. We know that because this defendant documented all those euthanasias in a log book,” said prosecutor Amy Ferreira.

Yeah I can picture that.  Sort of a pen and paper version of Jeffrey Dahmer’s refrigerator.

The prosecutor says the statute of limitations for animal cruelty in NV is 3 years so Frazier can not be charged for all of her alleged crimes.

frazier

Mary Jo Frazier in court, as shown on the Las Vegas Review-Journal website.

Frazier’s lawyer asked the judge to release his client on her own recognizance but the judge upheld the $50,000 warrant for Frazier’s arrest. The lawyer then asked for bail to be reduced to $6000 but that went over like a lead balloon.  Gee, maybe that whole fleeing the state thing after the police investigation wasn’t such a smart move by Frazier after all.  She was handcuffed and taken to jail.

(Pause for applause.)

Read this. Twice:

Frazier “systematically killed animals that came into the shelter” and “committed the same crime over and over and over again,” Ferreira said. “This is an individual who has engaged in this conduct repeatedly, who was told to stop.”

This is important.  The prosecutor in this case is saying that the systematic killing of shelter animals for convenience is a crime.

About.

Damn.

Time.

Also: other shelter workers killing animals instead of doing their jobs may want to jot that down.

Frazier has pleaded not guilty. Her attorney cites an absence of “criminal intent”.  Uh, lol?

Thank you once again Irresponsible Public for standing up for these animals when no one else would.  See a photo of the troublemakers here.

Today is officially a party day on the blog.  Bust out the sparkling juice and sequins.

(Thanks Clarice for the links.)

Good Ol’ Boys Taking AZ Shelter Back to the Bad Old Days

The Benson Animal Shelter in Arizona reportedly transformed under the leadership of ACO Laurie Fivecoat, about whom area animal advocates had many good things to say at a recent city council meeting:

Rica Powell, founder of Smiling Dog Rescue out of Benson, said that prior to Laurie Fivecoat’s appointment as shelter manager, the rescue community of Southern Arizona was not involved with the Benson Animal Shelter “in any way, shape or form,” citing a closed door policy and lack of transparency. She described the facility as a “shelter of the past, with a 1950s attitude.”

Powell said Fivecoat changed that when she came on board. “The changes that happened are astonishing,” Powell added. “She brought your shelter from an archaic situation to a vibrant up and coming shelter which was community involved, with volunteers and social networking, low cost spay and neuters,” and more.

[…]

“Last year almost 90 percent of the animals that were taken to the Benson shelter left alive and well,” [animal advocate Geir] Hundal said. He spoke of Fivecoat’s networking efforts with outside rescue organizations and other shelters, describing those efforts as “an unshakeable commitment to save every life possible, even at the expense of extra time and effort,” adding that “Staff would spend up to a year finding the right home for the right pet. That’s a job well done.”

The city’s good ol’ boy police chief apparently longed for that “shelter of the past” and re-hired a good ol’ boy former Benson ACO, Paul Teza, near the end of January, appointing him shelter manager. Fivecoat is still employed as an ACO but is no longer manager.  Teza had managed the facility several years ago, with a live release rate of just 59%. The first things he did upon being re-hired were to cease the transfer of animals to other shelters, shut out the team of volunteers except for those he personally approved, terminate all rescue partnerships except those he personally approved (reportedly none) and kill a dog named Rusty, a shelter favorite who was described by volunteers as “goofy”.

rusty

Rusty, as shown on the Benson News-Sun website.

Two year old Rusty had been “fawned over” by the public at adoption events and was one of the few dogs an elderly volunteer was able to walk regularly. Teza reportedly noted in Rusty’s records that the dog was “aggressive, a bite risk, nervous in confined spaces and that he actively avoided direct observation.” So he ordered him killed. Teza seems to have seen in 11 minutes behavioral traits that none of the volunteers saw in Rusty in the past 11 months.  I don’t think I would like that guy staring at me either.

When the local paper asked police chief Moncada about the killing, as well as the quashed networking and volunteer programs, he provided a statement.  It doesn’t adequately explain any of these issues and ends with the following:

Prior to Paul’s hiring, conditions at the shelter were poor at best. Now, between his and Sgt. (Floyd) Graf’s efforts, the shelter is in better condition.

So the shelter saving 89% of its animals was a hellhole but things are looking up now that Mr. 59% is in charge?  Maybe we should ask Rusty’s opinion – oh, never mind.

(Thanks Clarice for the link.)

Lying Idaho Shelter Kills, Lies, Blames and Lies

bunny

Bunny, as pictured on the KIVI website.

When Sheila Combs lost her family’s six year old Chihuahua/Boston Terrier, Bunny, on January 31, she immediately began looking for her.  Unable to find her beloved pet, she went the next day to the West Valley Humane Society in Caldwell. Bunny was not there so Ms. Combs filed an official missing pet report including an 8 X 10 photo and a detailed description of Bunny’s size, markings, wonky rear leg and three missing teeth. She was told that all missing pet reports are checked against new arrivals at the shelter. The family continued trying to find Bunny daily.  Although Ms. Combs never heard from the shelter, she visited again on February 9 to look for Bunny, just in case:

“They took me through all the rooms in the back where the dogs are in crates, and the new dogs that come in,” Combs said. “She wasn’t there.”

In fact, Bunny was there, having been picked up by AC on February 4:

West Valley Humane Society Executive Director Jonathan Perry says it’s unclear how Combs didn’t see Bunny in the lost and found area.
“As far as we know, it was always in the same kennel in the back, so it should’ve been seen,” Perry said.

Oops.

A stranger who had seen Ms. Combs’s online posts about Bunny contacted her on February 11 to let her know Bunny’s photo was on the shelter’s website.  Ms. Combs immediately called the shelter, understandably frantic over her lost family member:

“I said, ‘Listen! You’ve got to listen! That dog, “Tanna” on your website is my dog, I made a report, it’s in your book. I’m coming, it’s my dog don’t adopt her!” Combs explained.
By the time Sheila made it to the shelter roughly 20 minutes later, it was too late.

The director told the Combs family Bunny had already been adopted and initially, he declined to contact the adopters. After being pressed by Bunny’s family, he did make a phone call to the adopters, because you know, he cares, but had to leave a message.

Oops.

Turns out, those were all lies. The phone call? Fake.  The truth was that West Valley Humane had killed Bunny while the owner was on her way to reclaim her dog.

Oops.

Perry says the shelter vet saw stroke or seizure-like symptoms several times in Bunny beginning on February 7, and decided on the eleventh it was best for the dog to be put down.

See, the killing was totally justified. The vet saw seizures. Or strokes. Or something else medical sounding that begins with S. It was such a righteous killing that the director was motivated to fabricate an adoption story and make a *winkety wink* phone call to The Land of Make Believe to show he cared.

The whole wad of oopses and lies surrounding Bunny’s killing is the owner’s fault though, obviously:

Bunny wasn’t microchipped and due to her sensitive skin, she wasn’t wearing a collar at the time – something the shelter’s executive director says could have prevented the whole mix up.
While he says they plan to make procedural improvements to ensure something like this doesn’t happen again, he recommends all pet owners keep a current photo of their pets, always keep a collar on, and be sure all tag and microchip information is current and regularly updated.

And more blame from Brenda Cameron, president of the shelter’s board of directors:

“We had no way to call and inform the family their dog was in the shelter,” Cameron said.

No way except for the lost pet report. Or telling the owner in person when she was there looking through the kennels. Twice. No OTHER ways.

We do everything we can to reunite that animal with the family. Microchips help. Anything that we can identify the animal with. The owners did supply a picture but Bunny was actually an older dog with grey hair so that issue could have made things more difficult for volunteers or staff,” Cameron explained.

bunny at west valley

Bunny with grey on her face, as pictured on the KIVI website.

Oh my stars. Bunny had some grey hairs on her face therefore: unrecognizable. If only there was some way shelter professionals might be able to know that dog faces sometimes grey with age and that if the breed, markings, size, missing teeth and wonky leg are all a match between the lost pet report and the newly impounded lost pet, it’s worth a phone call to the owner. But I guess that’s just pie in the sky.

Oh and thanks, shortened hold periods:

In previous years, families have had their pets adopted out because they missed the three day deadline to pick up their missing dog or cat from the shelter. Cameron said the deadline used to be five days for lost strays, but the decision was made to shorten that time frame.

“When I came in, the shelter was overpopulated,” Cameron said. “We needed a way to move the dogs out of the shelter.”

When animals are in shelters for an extended period of time it can cause the pet to have mental, emotional and health problems in the future, she said.

A pet might go mental if they hold him for an additional two days. Must be a nice place.  It’s touching how concerned they are about moving the merchandise the possibility of PTSD in their dogs’ future but it sort of seems like the definite condition of DEATH should trump those concerns.

The board fired the director after he went on television and embarrassed them.  And they posted an apology to Bunny’s family on Facebook.  So obviously they take the killing very seriously.  I mentioned the apology, right? On Facebook.

*boop boop beep* I am pushing the buttons on my pretend telephone to call the Mayor of Impudentville because you know, I care.

(Thanks Clarice and Jan for the links.)

Louisiana Pound Employees Under Investigation by Police

The Ouachita Parish Sheriff’s Office is investigating allegations of wrongdoing by the director and three other employees of the Ouachita Parish pound in LA. The facility falls under the Ouachita Parish Police Jury:

Scotty Robinson, Police Jury President, says, “we had someone within the animal shelter come in and raise some concerns.”
Concerns surrounding allegations the director and other employees were using an inmate who had trustee status to work on their private projects, projects that the police jury’s attorney says are not allowed.
Jay Mitchell, OPPJ Attorney, says, “…constructed a barbeque grill…and also did some welding on some trailers Uh private trailers that were apparently may have been used sometimes in animal control work, But they were not owned by the parish.”

All four of the employees reportedly resigned rather than face termination by the parish.

In 2014, the pound killed approximately 63% of the animals in its care.  The only other online statistics I could find were from 2011 when the pound killed 60% of its dogs and 85% of its cats, according to a local volunteer group.  The group has a page detailing the thousands of pets needlessly killed each year at the pound along with all the standard excuses about how there aren’t enough homes, they “have to” kill every single day of the year, the irresponsible public blows, killing isn’t as much fun as it should be and smack in the middle, in boldface, is this:

ouachita parish enablers

Screengrab from a PAWS of NE LA webpage.

Oof.

So apparently this institutionalized killing for convenience has been going on for years, maybe since the pound’s inception, I don’t know, and it’s a total package complete with a band of enablers.  The director and staff don’t do their jobs to shelter animals but kill them instead while the volunteers stand ready to defend the killing and blame the public.  Maybe no one has ever done their jobs at this place, I don’t know.

But recently, “someone within the animal shelter” was moved to take action.  Not because the place is an epic fail and the bodies are really starting to pile up, not because there are proven alternatives which could be put into place to save the animals but continue to be ignored in favor of daily kill-fests – but because somebody got a grill built by an inmate.  And there was WELDING.

Enough is enough, you know?  I mean killing animals hand over fist every day of the year instead of doing our jobs is one thing but getting a grill made and having welding on some trailers Uh private trailers that were apparently may have been used sometimes in animal control work, But they were not owned by the parish – well that’s just objectionable.  There comes a time in every man’s life when he’s got to take a stand and this is that time.

But do not fear, the mission endures:

[A]lthough down four employees, Robinson says it hasn’t seriously affected the shelter.
[…]
“Our treasurer office has kind of taking over the day to day operations as far as the financial and the money and things that go on.”

Things that go on. I dread to think.

(Thanks Clarice for the links.)

NM Shelter Killing 10 Dogs a Day for Convenience

KOB in New Mexico reports that the Valencia Co Animal Shelter is overcrowded with more than 240 dogs at the facility. In response, they are killing for convenience:

This week, the shelter has killed 8-10 dogs every single day and even that’s not nearly enough.
“I can’t bring myself to putting 40 to 50 dogs on that list at a time like I should be,” [supervisor Patty Mugan] said. “We’re getting to that point when we’re going to need to.”

Not need to – choose to. Killing is a choice, as is lifesaving, which is hard work:

“It’s not fair to the kennel techs to have to have twice the work to do to clean and walk dogs and feed them and everything else,” Mugan said.

I’m sorry but where in life do we sign up for FAIR? Because I have been wanting FAIR so hard all these years and I’ve never known where I go to get it. Is it Valencia Co, NM?

And the response to UNfair is kill, I guess.

“But it’s sure not fair to the animal sitting in a crate on borrowed time. It’s very hard for us mentally to watch day after day.”
[…]
“It’s not easy to be the one to look in their eyes and tell them goodbye,” she said.

Where does this sense of entitlement come from?  Life should be fair and easy and not require ironing.

I’m glad it’s not easy to kill animals you are supposed to be sheltering. It should be hard. It should be impossible really.

Staff is apparently trying to ship the problem out of state by getting rescue groups to transport dogs.  But since every state in the U.S. kills shelter animals, shipping shelter pets to other states is not a long term solution.  It just redistributes the killing.  Maybe that seems fair or easier to some people, I don’t know.

Instead of killing animals and making excuses for it, why not try implementing the proven programs of the No Kill Equation?  Start looking the animals entrusted to your care in the eyes and telling them hello.  Tell them you are committed to protecting them from harm and getting them into loving homes.  It requires hard work but seeing all your animals get out alive sounds pretty sweet.

(Thanks Clarice for the link.)

Scott Co Pound, So Killy

scott co wjhl

Screengrab from the WJHL website showing puppies at the Scott Co pound.

Volunteers at Scott Co Animal Control in Gate City, Virginia are speaking out against the needless killing of dogs at the facility and the staff’s failure to work with rescues. But surprise! – only joking, there isn’t any surprise:

News channel 11 spoke with the Scott County Animal Control today and they say they’re not doing anything wrong.
[…]
Jake Dougherty works at Scott County Animal Control and he said they are following procedure. He said, “the required amount of time that we have to keep [animals] is 7 days if they don’t have a collar. If they have a collar, we have to keep them 10 days.”

In addition to following procedure, Scott Co AC is functioning primarily as a pet killing facility where 65% of the animals are killed. Volunteers say that sometimes adopters inquire about a pet only to be told the dog was already killed. So why can’t slack-ass adopters get on the ball sooner and get down to the pet killing facility to adopt while the dogs are still alive? Maybe it’s the hours, which the county’s website (which shows zero dogs for adoption) states are 8 – 12 Monday through Saturday.

Dougherty says additional staff would help. He said, “If we had a full-time employee … that would, I’m sure, double our chances of people coming in to see what we’ve got.”

Star light, star bright,
The first star I see tonight;
I wish I may, I wish I might,
Have the wish I wish tonight.

Gosh, if only Dougherty’s wish could come true, the dogs would have double the chance!

Scott County Animal Control actually already has 2 full-time employees, including Dougherty, along with one part-time employee.

Oh. So the dogs already have what – quintuple the chance of staying alive but are still being killed at a rate of 65%?  But IF there is room and IF someone wants them, Dougherty says dogs might be allowed to live beyond the 7 days – up to a month even.  Gee whiz!  *kisses ring*  Except when they aren’t:

Volunteers, like Billy Denton, said that just last month animals at Scott County Animal Control Shelter were killed too soon.
Denton said they’ve got “21 kennels there and there were twelve dogs at the shelter and 6 dogs were euthanized.”

Oh. Well anyway ho, hum:

Dougherty says euthanizing animals is part of the job. He said, “You have to distance yourself a little bit from the animals.”
“I can’t look at them the way that everyone else does because you’re not going to find homes for every animal,” He said.

So the dogs are killed by someone who doesn’t look at them like other human beings do because he considers killing them to be his job. That puts a swell image in mind for every poor dog who draws his last breath at the Scott Co pound.

One thing you can’t fault him on though is his logic. It’s absolutely correct that you are not going to find homes for every animal when you’re only open for 4 hours a day, sit around pining for a full time employee when you are one of the full time employees, don’t work with rescues, don’t market your dogs and don’t regard dogs like everyone else does.  And you definitely aren’t going to find homes for dead dogs, which is what you make most of your live dogs into, because you think it’s your job.

Maybe he should distance himself further.  Like to Mars.

(Thanks Clarice for the link.)

Shawnee Pound Gasses 3 Dogs Because It Can

The animals at the long troubled gassing pound in Shawnee, OK have been getting some help from area rescuers.  With a paltry 48 hour holding period, rescuers must continually scramble to get pets out alive.  They have reportedly been able to pull every dog at the small pound since May.  But that streak ended last week when the city gassed three dogs, one of whom was reportedly slated to be pulled that morning.  Tragically, the public outcry is being directed at the former owners (who may or may not be known) instead of those who actually killed the animals.

The Shawnee city manager, Justin Erickson, says the pound will, at some unspecified time, stop gassing and start killing via injection.  He plans to talk more about that next year.  Cause I mean, what’s the hurry, right? As for embracing the proven programs used by hundreds of open admission no kill shelters around the country, that’s a no:

“We are not able to transition to no kill at this time,” said Erickson during Monday’s city council meeting.

I assume that explanation will satisfy everyone paying for the shelter to not shelter animals.  If not, maybe local animal advocates can stop dreaming up Evil Former Owner fantasies and start pressuring public officials to do their jobs.  Or just let the city keep rescuers in continual crisis mode, with them gassing the occasional pet because they can, and enabling them by failing to unequivocally blame those doing the killing.  The more the city is able to distract advocates, the more things stay the same.

Let’s be clear:  Some shelter pets are lost.  Their owners want them back.  Others are in between homes.  It doesn’t matter who used to own a shelter pet or how that animal arrived at the shelter.  There is only now.  Now is an opportunity to help the animal, starting with protecting his right to live.  Everything else is a distraction.

(Thanks Clarice.)

Nevada Pound Director Avoids Felony Charges, Enabled by Police Chief

As we are often chided by those opposed to hearing the truth about pet killing facilities, nobody wants to kill animals.  And this is true, with the exception of everybody who does want to kill animals, especially those who pee their pants a little every time a box of Fatal Plus arrives in the mail:

Jenny Silvia, a shelter volunteer, told police […] that [former Boulder City Animal Control Supervisor Mary Jo] Frazier “finds joy in killing animals.”

Police were talking to people who had worked with Frazier at the pound while they conducted an investigation into allegations of needless animal killings by Frazier:

A frantic phone call [in April] had prompted a Boulder City police detective to investigate whether the city’s head of animal control had, just for fun, been killing animals in the city’s shelter.

[…]

Boulder City Animal Control Officer Ann Inabnitt told police that Frazier, her supervisor, didn’t want to provide medical care to Lotus, an abused 11-week-old pit bull suffering from shattered teeth, a swollen head and a broken left hip. Frazier’s reason, her co-worker told police, was “we don’t spend money on pit bulls and because I’m just going to stick her anyway,” according to the detective’s affidavit to support an arrest warrant. […] Frazier refused to put the pit bull on the veterinarian-recommended diet of soft food, records show.

The police investigation reportedly found that Frazier had personally killed approximately half the animals who were impounded by Boulder City AC since being promoted to supervisor in 2006.  She instructed staff not to advertise animals for adoption online.  The Boulder City pound was never at capacity and animals were killed while cages sat empty.

Most of the animals who were killed by Frazier were killed upon impound, in violation of the city ordinance requiring a 5 day holding period.  Another city ordinance requires an exam by a veterinarian before any animal is killed but police determined Frazier was routinely violating that law too.

After Frazier’s husband divorced her crazy ass, he says she stole his dachshund, took him to the pound and killed him.

The police investigation culminated in the issue of an arrest warrant on felony and gross misdemeanor charges against Frazier – a warrant that was never served because the chief of police, who is in charge of the pound, quashed the whole thing.  Frazier retired two days later.  She is apparently collecting retirement checks from the city and has skipped town, probably to a place where they have drinks with little umbrellas in them.  Little umbrellas that look like needles filled with Fatal Plus, I’m guessing.

Police Chief Bill Conger defended sweeping the whole thing under a rug:

The chief said that he himself showed Boulder City Attorney David Olsen the investigation and that Olsen said felony charges would not stick, though “maybe a couple of misdemeanors” would.
“Why go forward with something that’s not going to go very far, number one, and number two, when she resigned this whole thing stopped,” Conger said.

A leetle problem:  the city attorney says he never heard word one from Conger about the case.

Another teensy snag:  After an area paper published the story about how Frazier was allowed to get her rocks off by needlessly killing animals on the taxpayers’ dime then retire before she could be arrested, take the taxpayers’ money and go someplace sunny, taxpayers were displeased.  They began an online campaign, held a protest at the police station and generally raised hell.

In response, the police chief decided he’d kick the ball down the field a little, then fall on the pile after the opponent was tackled to make it look like he was trying:

Boulder City officials have reversed course, saying they will submit previously dismissed information from a criminal investigation of the city’s former animal control supervisor to the Clark County District Attorney’s office for review.

As far as Conger’s role in enabling Frazier’s escape from justice:

“People get in trouble and resign all the time,” the chief said Tuesday.

Chief of Meh.

Also:  don’t criticize, we all want the same thing, if you don’t volunteer at your local pet killing facility you are part of the problem, blahcetera.

rooster

(Photo by Casey Post.)

(Thanks Clarice and Jan.)

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,030 other followers