Oh Roswell

the menagerieMaybe you’ve heard that aliens crashed in Roswell, NM in 1947 and the government covered it up.  Maybe you are skeptical.  I, for one, believe.  And as proof, I offer the current city leadership of Roswell, specifically the mayor and the police chief, because their actions can only be attributed to some sort of alien mind control.

Regular readers may remember when Roswell mayor Dennis Kintigh banned every rescue group in the state from saving dogs at the pound because of an incident involving the son of one of his police detectives.  Now animal advocates are voicing concern about dogs and cats being killed at the pound while cages sit empty.  But explanation:

[P]olice chief Phil Smith says they’re just following the ordinance that gives dogs one week and cats four days to get adopted.

“We’re going to stick to the rules, we’re going to do it to the letter,” said Smith.

To clarify, the it they are doing to the letter is killing lost and homeless pets.  So although the facility has space to house these animals, the city staff opts to kill them instead, because they can.

And then there’s this:

Both Smith and Mayor Dennis Kintigh say that if taxpayers want to fund and run their own shelter, they should.

Wait –

I thought –

Aren’t taxpayers already shelling out $400 grand a year to fund this shelter?  Isn’t this shelter the taxpayers’ own shelter?  How could either the police chief or the mayor, both of whom would have to know that taxpayers are paying for this shelter (and their salaries), possibly say something so absurd out loud and not drunk?

You see what I’m saying?  Aliens.

(Thanks Clarice and Davyd for sending me this story.)

Caddo Parish Killing Thousands of Pets, Blaming the Public

The main “service” provided to animals by the staff at Caddo Parish Animal Services in Louisiana is killing:

Caddo took in 8,744 dogs and cats last year and euthanized 6,805, according to data provided by the shelter.

Based on these numbers, Caddo’s kill rate for 2014 was 78%.  That is a staggering number of dead pets.  And you don’t achieve those kinds of numbers without enablers:

“I hesitate to blame the shelter because I see what they are up against.” – Reed Ebarb, Companions of Caddo Animal Services president and member of the Caddo Parish Animal Services Advisory Committee

“The missing component is taking place out in the community where people are having puppies in the backyard. […]  More needs to be done on the community’s end. People need to be more responsible.  Until we overcome that piece we have an uphill battle to fight. We can do everything right and still fall short.” – Caddo Parish Administrator Woodrow Wilson Jr.

Let’s clarify one thing:  When you are killing roughly 8 out of every 10 dogs and cats who come through your doors, there is zero chance you are doing “everything right”.  More likely, you are doing about 8 out of 10 things wrong.  Dead wrong.  But in this safe and comfortable environment, supported by local killing apologists, it’s little wonder the pound’s director takes no responsibility for the killing:

Everett Harris, Animal Services director, said the shelter’s numbers “are at the mercy of the community.”

“We are a community shelter dealing with a community problem,” he said.

An animal is considered property by law, and if an owner turns over the property, the shelter is obligated by law to take it, Harris explained.

File that complaint under WHY YOU ARE THERE, SHERLOCK.

I guess everyone who lives in Caddo Parish is the suck, except for the pound workers blamelessly killing more than 500 animals a month because the tyrannical public has the pound under its thumb, wielding its absolute power without compassion.  Also:  there are reportedly puppies in backyards there which is a unique challenge not faced by any other communities anywhere so kill everything, obviously.

(Thanks Clarice for the link.)

NYC Shelters Killing Animals People are Trying to Save

Sarge, ID #A1028331, on the kill list for today in Brooklyn, as posted on Facebook.

Sarge, ID #A1028331, on the kill list for today in Brooklyn, as posted on Facebook.

Even as New York City Animal Care & Control claims on its website that it has an 80% live release rate, rescuers and adopters complain that the shelter kills animals who have homes lined up as a result of the cumbersome and faulty process required to save animals from the kill room.  The complaint is not new but the NY Post ran an article on the issue this week, placing a spotlight on the problem:

Every night at 6 p.m., the shelter posts a list of “at risk” animals to be euthanized. Rescue groups and members of the public have until noon the following day to reserve them [via NYCACC’s online system]. But the “at risk” list was offline at least one night last week and several times in February due to technical difficulties. And the crashes have tragic consequences.

Remy was reserved via the online system by a rescuer one night last month who paid $52 for her via credit card.  When the rescuer arrived at at the shelter to pick Remy up, she was told there had been a problem with the paperwork and Remy had been killed.  Another rescuer reserved a dog called Lady last month but there was a problem with that hold too.  Lady was killed by shelter staff.

Another rescuer, who asked to remain anonymous, said she calls and sends e-mails to ACC staff after placing holds because she doesn’t trust the system.
“Frustrating things happen,” she said. “I’ve pulled two cats and gotten two different ones. I’ve pulled animals [that were advertised as] 3 years old and were actually 13 years old. “They always say this is because of computer problems,” she added.

When contacted by the Post, NYCACC refused to comment about the computer problems resulting in the needless killing of pets who had homes waiting.  But the spokesman did have a complaint to lodge:  the online system is often used to place “fake” holds on pets just to get them off the kill list for 48 hours.  Imagine that – people acting out of desperation to prevent animals from being needlessly killed at the shelter.  It’s as if the public actually cares about saving the lives of homeless animals.  But NYCACC isn’t going to be fooled into not killing animals and has designed the system to ensure that all animals with “fake” holds will definitely go to the kill room:

When the “fake” adopter fails to the show up within the 48-hour hold period, the animal is euthanized. During that time, a real adopter could have stepped in. But the online system doesn’t allow for a backup rescue after the deadline.

Evil.

Here’s a thought:  if the online reservation system is failing to save lives – both by accident and by design – and it’s evident that the public doesn’t want healthy/treatable animals killed at the shelter, maybe it’s time to consider ending the practice of killing animals and start doing the job of sheltering.  Make it NYCACC policy that no healthy/treatable animals are killed under any circumstances.  That way, it doesn’t matter if there are a hundred computer glitches a day because no animal is going to be killed as a result.  And the “fake” hold problem is eliminated by virtue of the fact that there is no kill list.  Problems all solved.

(Thanks Anne for the link.)

Nobody WANTS to Kill Animals: Monroe Co Edition

Monroe Co, FL contracts with three animal shelters for services. Here are the 2014 kill stats for each:

Humane Animal Care Coalition (aka Upper Keys Animal Shelter)

Cat kill rate: 81%
Dog kill rate: 43%

Safe Harbor Animal Rescue of the Keys

Cat kill rate: 31%
Dog kill rate: 18%

Florida Keys SPCA

Cat kill rate: 47%
Dog kill rate: 18%

While none of these shelters is no kill, one is clearly failing worse than the others.  Local media sought an explanation:

Marsha Garrettson, director of the Upper Keys Animal Shelter, offered little explanation as to why the euthanasia trends in the Upper Keys were far above the rest of the island chain.

She told the Free Press her nonprofit organization is financially sound and can afford to provide surgeries and healthcare to any animal brought it. Her shelter also provides free spay and neuter services, which she says has reduced overall intake of cats and dogs over the years.

“This was never about the money,” Garrettson said. “It never has been.”

M’kaaay, so money is not now nor has it ever been a problem.  Upper Keys can pay for veterinary care for any animal at the facility.  But the staff is killing them instead.  Why?

[Garrettson] said her shelter never euthanizes an adoptable animal. With the exception of feral cats, every cat or dog put down is either too sick or aggressive for adoption, she said. However, she acknowledged that the higher euthanasia percentages in the Upper Keys do not indicate that animals there are sicker or more aggressive than those elsewhere in the county.

Wait, what?  Money to pay for vet care is no object yet 81% of cats and 43% of dogs impounded were killed for illness or behavior?  How is one county facility being allowed to fail so miserably while stats from its two neighboring shelters show that less killing is achievable?

Meet Enabler Number One:

 Monroe County Commissioner Sylvia Murphy said she was not concerned by the difference in euthanasia percentages.

“I’m perfectly happy with the services at the clinic,” she told the Free Press.

Murphy reiterated that the Upper Keys shelter only euthanizes ill, diseased or aggressive animals.

To be clear, the “service” most animals at the Upper Keys facility receive is killing.  Which this elected official is perfectly happy with.

And Enabler Number Two:

Tammy Foxe, director of the Key West shelter, declined to speculate why percentages were lower in her region.

“I think the three county shelters are working very hard for this community,” she said.

There are hundreds of open admission shelters all over the country saving 90% and more of their pets.  Those shelters are working very hard for their communities.  These three, not so much.  And one of the three is lagging way behind the other two, clearly disproving the notion that all three are fabulous.  It almost sounds like this person is ashamed of her work saving lives.

Mercifully, there was a quote at the end of the article from the token Regular Person Who Says What I Am Thinking:

Nancy Warner, a member of Forgotten Felines of the Florida Keys, said she was appalled by the euthanasia data.

[…]

Warner said the county should find someone else to run the Key Largo shelter.

“It would be better for people to let their animal run out the door than take it to the shelter,” she said.

Thank you.

The Upper Keys shelter has the financial means to treat every animal under its roof.  But they are putting most of the animals into garbage bags.  What’s the money being spent on – Fatal Plus?  Compassion fatigue counseling for the staff?  Cheery posters for the kill room?

I hope Monroe Co taxpayers stand up and demand accountability from their shelters and elected officials.  Get rid of the pet killers and their enablers and put people in place who are willing to do their jobs, even when – and especially when – it means ruffling feathers. That’s why they call it work.

(Thanks Clarice for the link.)

MO Shelter: Rescues Down, Adoptions Sluggish, Killings Up, Director “Happy”

The city of Chillicothe, MO contracts the Livingston Co Humane Society (LCHS) for animal control services.  LCHS manages the Forest O. Triplett Memorial Animal Shelter, aka the Chillicothe Animal Shelter, which is run by Lesley Patek.

In 2014, the number of dogs and cats transferred from the Chillicothe shelter to rescue groups dropped markedly from the previous year:

In 2013, 276 dogs were sent to rescues, and in 2014 158 dogs went to rescues.

[…]

Rescued cats decreased from 10 to zero[.]

Adoptions remained stagnant while cat intake numbers increased.  Cat killings also increased in 2014 with Chillicothe killing 64% of its cats.  In summary, a dismal performance for the year which any shelter director should be working furiously to turn around for fear of losing her job, if nothing else.  But:

Lesley Patek, shelter guardian, said she is happy with the numbers. “I think we do an excellent job, but we can’t save the world,” she said.

[…]

“We had to put down litters and litters of kittens this year,” Patek said.

[…]

[The killing of pets at Chillicothe] is no fault of the animal’s or of the animals shelter’s, but more so a fault of irresponsible animal owners, Patek said.

If you can’t own it, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it – and this person clearly can’t own it.

I checked the facility’s website to get some insight into the excellent job they do there.  Chillicothe doesn’t disclose what they charge to adopt pets but it sounds like adoption fees are set on a whim:

A pet’s adoption fee will sometimes be higher due to veterinary costs for illness or injury, or due to the fact that it’s a “popular” breed.

There are 8 pets listed for adoption on that page:  3 adult cats, 2 American bulldogs, 1 miniature poodle, 1 papillon mix and 1 chihuahua mix.  I’m guessing the cats all had vet expenses and the dogs are all “popular” breeds.  New pets were last added to the listings on October 10, 2014.  They’re doing the best they can, probably.  I hate that the irresponsible public keeps forcing them to kill animals instead of marketing them for adoption.  And we all know why there are no kittens for adoption at a place that kills “litters and litters of kittens”:  irresponsible pet owners.

Potential adopters are required to sign a contract which states that the adoption fee isn’t really an adoption fee but rather a “gift” so they can’t get their money back if they return the pet.  And the adopter will be required to return the pet at any point during the pet’s life if someone from LCHS conducts an inspection and determines “the animal’s condition and/or living conditions is/are unsatisfactory or that I have violated one or more terms and conditions of this contract.”  So you’re not actually buying the pet and your right to keep your family member is subject to the whims of the LCHS representative’s idea of “unsatisfactory”, whenever.

Aaaaaaanyway, excellent job there Chillicothe, doing your best to get animals into homes.  You can’t save the world.  Or even one kitten, apparently.

(Thanks Clarice for the link.)

Owned Cat Trapped by Police, Taken to Cat Killing Facility

The most recent yearly report posted for Baldwin Co Animal Control facility in Alabama is 2012.  That year, the county took in 2526 cats, killing 2304 of them – a kill rate of 91% for cats.  Clearly killing is the default for cats at the Baldwin Co pound and it is a rare event for any cat to leave the facility outside of a garbage bag.

Kiki, as pictured on al.com.

Kiki, as pictured on al.com.

Tragically, as if there aren’t enough cats already being killed at the facility, the Foley police department traps cats upon request and takes them to the Baldwin Co pound.

Foley pet owner Diana Rohe thought her 10 year old cat named Kiki had gotten lost in January.  She searched the neighborhood for weeks and offered a $1000 reward for Kiki, whom she had rescued as a kitten.  It turns out, Ms. Rohe’s neighbor had complained to the Foley police about cats getting into trash cans and requested that traps be set.  Kiki was caught in one of the traps, taken to the county pound and killed for “erratic behavior” although obviously her chances of being killed there were extremely high, all behavioral considerations aside, since she was a cat.  The neighbor stood by in silence as Ms. Rohe searched for her pet.  Ms. Rohe was unaware that traps had been set on the property.

This week, Ms. Rohe spoke before the Foley city council about the needless killing of her beloved pet:

“My cat lost her life because there is no warning from the city. There’s no kind of sign, there’s no kind of phone call, there’s no notice on the Internet, on a website or something to say, ‘We’re going to be setting traps in your area,'” Rohe said.

Rohe described her cat being “lured and tricked like a little kid with candy.”

[…]

“I’m just telling y’all my life has changed,” Rohe said emotionally. “I’m devastated over what she went through … They put her to sleep because she was so traumatized.”

Foley police chief David Wilson said that the officers will start putting up signs to notify residents when they have set traps for cats:

“I’ve apologized to her that her Kiki was put down like that,” he said. “You couldn’t have made this up. And we’re going take measure so it doesn’t happen again, at least like that.”

Maybe not exactly like that, but the pound’s statistics show that any cat brought in will most likely be killed.  Putting up trapping signs for cat haters to rip down won’t force the county shelter to start doing its job.  As it stands, the county is operating little more than a pet killing facility with regard to cats and the city of Foley should either demand that cats actually be sheltered or terminate the relationship with the pound.  If Foley insists on trapping cats, the city has an obligation to take them to a safe place and the Baldwin Co pound is not safe for cats.

(Thank you Anne for sending me this story.)

St Johns Co Oops-Kills Beloved Lost Cat Upon Intake

Tails having a birthday with his boy, as shown on the News4Jax website.

Tails having a birthday with his boy, as shown on the News4Jax website.

A neutered and declawed indoor cat named Tails became lost last week while the owners were having work done inside their Florida home.  Owner Chelsea Santoro began putting up Lost Cat posters around the neighborhood.  Unbeknownst to anyone, Tails had climbed into the engine compartment of a neighbor’s rental car.  Miraculously, Tails was unharmed despite riding on the engine for 12 miles while the neighbor returned the car to the rental agency. A worker there found the cat.

Before anyone knew who Tails belonged to, and believing the St Johns Co pound was the safest place to bring the pet so that he could be reunited with his owner, an employee at the rental car company contacted AC to turn Tails over.  Once the company connected the dots and determined Ms. Santoro was the owner, they let her know the good news about Tails:

Santoro was ecstatic.
“They told me stories about how they were cuddling with him, and playing with him, and how they made him a little bed.”

Ms. Santoro immediately called the pound to reclaim her pet.  But she was told that pound staff had killed Tails.  The impounding ACO, on the job for two years, wrongly listed Tails as an unneutered stray male cat.  Tails was killed upon intake.  Oops:

“Our initial inquiry into this incident indicates that the county’s policies and procedures were not followed, and there was no justification for the actions that occurred, said Michael Ryan, St. Johns County’s communication manager. “The issue is currently under investigation and the employee in question has been placed on administrative leave. Appropriate measures will be taken to prevent this from occurring again. The loss of a pet under any circumstances is tragic and our condolences are extended to the family.”

Ryan seems to have learned a thing or two since St Johns Co killed an owned, lost, microchipped dog named Baby Girl a few months ago.  At that time, he was all blame-the-filthy-owners-for-not-finding-their-dog-that-we-didn’t-bother-to-scan.  Now he’s singing the “it won’t happen again” tune although to be accurate, he should be saying “it won’t happen again, again” but that’s just me being picky probably.

Tails and his boy, as shown on the News4Jax website.

Tails and his boy, as shown on the News4Jax website.

Anyhoo, don’t criticize because we all want the same thing and if cat owners actually loved their pets then shelters would have a higher RTO rate and if only people would spay and neuter – oh, uh… never mind.

(Thanks Clarice for sending me this story.)

Martin Co Pound Director Fired and Arrested

Martin Co Animal Control on Landfill Road in Williamston, NC is open from 8:30 – 10:00 am and 3:30 – 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday.  The website says, with a straight face:

The Martin County Animal encourages animal adoption. […] Please come by during the hours above to consider pets for adoption.

There do not appear to be any listings for lost or adoptable pets on the website.

In 2013, Martin Co AC took in close to 1400 dogs and cats, killing 67% of them. That year, Henley “Pete” Brock was promoted by the county from Lead ACO to Director of the pound.

On February 9, 2015, Brock allegedly attempted to kill a cat then placed the pet in a freezer. The animal was found alive the next morning. Three days later, Brock allegedly attempted to kill another cat then left the facility. An ACO found the pet still alive and brought the animal to a vet where he was re-killed. The first cat is reportedly still alive. The NC Department of Agriculture has suspended Brock’s kill license while it investigates.

An agriculture department spokesman said they have also notified other authorities of possible missing narcotics at the animal shelter. The Martin County Sheriff’s Office referred questions back to the county manager on whether they were also conducting an investigation.

Based upon Brock’s alleged failure to lock up and account for the controlled substances used to kill animals as well as the two botched attempts at cat killings, Martin Co fired Brock. Sounds like he took it well:

WITN News has learned that Brock was arrested today by deputies on a charge of communicating threats. The victim was a former co-worker of Brock’s, according to deputies.

Brock has bonded out of jail. I hope once the state’s (and possibly the county sheriff’s) investigation is complete, all applicable criminal charges related to Brock’s activities at the pound will be brought. Right now, he is not charged with any animal-related crimes.  And I’m not holding my breath while waiting.

Respectful letters demanding a complete and transparent investigation into all possible criminal activities at the Martin Co pound may be sent to:

Do better, Martin Co.  On everything.

(Thanks Clarice and Lisa for the links.)

Houston Has Shipped Thousands of Shelter Dogs to Colorado

Dog ID #A1296681 at BARC, as pictured on PetHarbor.

Dog ID #A1296681 at BARC, as pictured on PetHarbor.

This week, the Houston Press took an in-depth look at the issue of transporting dogs from the city’s BARC shelter to CO.  A well funded group called Rescued Pets Movement (RPM) pulled more than 4300 dogs from the Houston city pound in 2013 and shipped them to rescues in CO.  What happened to the dogs later is unknown:

No one can say with certainty what will happen to all of this shipment’s animals, nor can every other animal transferred to the groups be accounted for.

[…]

It’s no matter, though, because neither Mayor Annise Parker nor BARC Director Greg Damianoff appears to be concerned where the animals wind up, as long as they’re not Houston’s problem anymore.

Feel notfree to ask questions:

The Press learned quickly that asking questions about Houston dumping thousands of animals on another state is a bit of a sore spot. Neither Parker nor Damianoff would talk to us for this story, and BARC delayed the release of public records for 14 days. We had asked for the names of groups RPM partners with — information we believe the public has the right to see, since the public is footing part of the bill.

[…]

If you in any way question RPM’s practices, you are branded a dog-killer.

When the Houston Press contacted one of the receiving rescues to ask for numbers on the dogs imported from Houston, they got the runaround:

[Becca] Orin said she didn’t have exact numbers at the ready for how many RPM dogs Farfel’s [Farm Rescue] received and adopted out in 2013, but that she could probably get them. But, she said, “I’ll have to talk to RPM and see what they want us to say.”

But RPM and BARC are quick to cite numbers regarding the dogs Houston has sent out of state while shining up their PARTICIPANT trophies:

On a recent Facebook post, RPM congratulated BARC — and technically itself — on a January 2015 live release rate of 80.6 percent.

[…]

The numbers are impressive. Hundreds of dogs have been saved from death row. Hundreds more will need saving next month. And RPM will transport those to Colorado. Hundreds more will need saving the month after, and the month after that.

RPM will continue to congratulate BARC on those fabulous percentages. And percentages are math — you just can’t argue with them. On paper, those percentages are damned impressive.

On paper, those percentages don’t point out the obvious: Those dogs and cats are going to Colorado because no city in Colorado is suffering animal overpopulation like Houston is. Those cities, like the cities that Rescue Waggin’ partners with, tackled those problems years ago. And they did not tackle them by sending thousands of animals to Texas or anywhere else.

While it’s true that Colorado is not killing as many shelter pets as Texas, Colorado does still kill animals.  And many of them might have been saved had resources not been directed toward animals imported from other states.

If we take a look at the 2013 statistics (the most recent year available at this time) for all of Colorado’s registered shelters and rescues, we see the state started out the year with roughly 5000 dogs already in the system.  Over the course of the year, shelters and rescues took in roughly 79,000 additional dogs and imported more than 17,000 dogs from out of state.  Of the total reported dogs in the system, about 2000 were listed as DOA leaving roughly 82,000 dogs as potentially savable, excluding those imported from out of state.  We know that not every dog is savable but there are a number of open admission shelters in the United States saving 99% of their dogs.  In comparison, approximately 9% of the dogs in the CO system were killed or died in shelter care in 2013, excluding the imports. Instead of saving 99%, CO only saved 91% of its own dogs (and that’s including roughly 4000 dogs listed as “missing, stolen, etc.”), and then imported 17,000 more from other states.

I asked Davyd Smith of No Kill Colorado how both the importation of dogs and breed specific legislation (BSL), the discriminatory practice of banning dogs based on body shape, contributes to the needless killing of dogs in the state:

Colorado imported 17,000 dogs from out of state in 2013 and killed 7,000. Now even assuming that half of these dogs were truly euthanized, that means we passed an opportunity to save 3,500 because we imported too many dogs from other states.

BSL is still a problem in Colorado. Because of BSL there are many communities, including the single metro area of Denver, where Pit Bull types are not legal. 4,800 of the 7,000 dogs killed were Pit Bull type dogs. Clearly, they are not being assessed for temperament or health to land on the kill floor.

By shipping dogs to CO, Houston will not solve its shelter killing problems, which stem not from pet overpopulation (which has been debunked), but from a failure to fully implement the proven model used by successful open admission no kill shelters all over the country.  And Colorado will presumably continue to kill its own dogs who are being displaced by dogs imported from out of state.

Colorado is in a position to help shelter pets in its neighboring states but has no right to take the lives of healthy/treatable dogs already in its shelter system while importing more.  Colorado needs to get its house in order by saving every shelter animal who can be saved statewide, regardless of body shape.  This might mean reducing the number of imported dogs in order to redirect resources toward those already in CO shelters, waiting for help.  And it most certainly means directing resources toward the elimination of breed bans.  Likewise, Houston could redirect the vast resources being spent on transport toward implementing the programs of the No Kill Equation in order to save its own shelter pets.

An unwavering commitment to saving the lives of every healthy/treatable animal in the shelter is the foundation of no kill.  Start there.

(Thank you Clarice and Davyd for the links.)

Nobody Wants to Kill Animals: Josephine Co Edition

Screengrab from KTVL showing a portion of a protest sign held by a Riley supporter.

Screengrab from KTVL showing a portion of a protest sign held by a Riley supporter.

A dog reportedly wandered into a family’s yard in Grant’s Pass, Oregon last month.  The family kept the dog for 3 weeks, calling her Riley, while area animal advocates networked her to find her possible owner.  Riley was reportedly a friendly dog who got along well with humans of all ages, canines and chickens.

On January 10, Riley got lost and was picked up by the Josephine Co pound.  Those who had been working to help the dog attempted to get her out but were refused.  First the county said Riley had to be held for a minimum of 3 days for possible owner redemption.  Then the county said they had to keep her for a veterinary evaluation, which took another week.  Riley reportedly tested positive for heartworm and passed a temperament test while at the pound.  Her advocates raised money from the community for heartworm treatment, found an adopter and continued to seek her release from the pound.

Making no headway, a protest was organized for Monday, January 26.  Protesters showed up at the county courthouse with signs saying “Save Riley”.  But the pound had already killed Riley on Friday, January 23.  County commissioner Cherryl Walker issued a statement that day in response to the public outcry.  She states Riley was killed upon recommendation of a vet because the dog:

  • had fleas and ticks
  • was over 8 years old
  • had tested positive for heartworm
  • had “demonstrated aggressive behavior”

Obviously failing to sell even herself on her lame excuses, Ms. Walker goes on to imply that heartworm is as frightening a public health issue as malaria and that Riley may have died undergoing treatment anyway.  So to protect the community from malaria heartworm and since you know, dog could have fallen over dead anytime, anywhere, anyway, the county decided to kill her.  She makes no mention of the rescuers trying to adopt the dog, that it wouldn’t have cost the county any resources to save Riley or that Riley had a right to live, even if she wasn’t young and even though she had parasites.

Diane Hoover, director of the county health department which oversees the pound, is totally fine with Riley’s killing:

“I don’t feel like overriding a vet’s recommendation, when he’s a licensed professional,” Hoover said.

Yeah sometimes I don’t feel like putting forth effort at my job either.  But then I worry maybe my boss won’t feel like paying me if I don’t do a decent job.  I guess Ms. Hoover doesn’t have that concern.  No need to seek a second opinion from another vet or let the dog go to the adopter who wanted her or anything at all actually.

[The Josephine Co pound] typically has to euthanize more than 500 dogs a year. More than 700 dogs are adopted out to good homes in an average year.

Has to?  Because Riley’s case makes it seem more like WANTS TO.

(Thanks Clarice for the links.)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 976 other followers