Louisiana Pound Employees Under Investigation by Police

The Ouachita Parish Sheriff’s Office is investigating allegations of wrongdoing by the director and three other employees of the Ouachita Parish pound in LA. The facility falls under the Ouachita Parish Police Jury:

Scotty Robinson, Police Jury President, says, “we had someone within the animal shelter come in and raise some concerns.”
Concerns surrounding allegations the director and other employees were using an inmate who had trustee status to work on their private projects, projects that the police jury’s attorney says are not allowed.
Jay Mitchell, OPPJ Attorney, says, “…constructed a barbeque grill…and also did some welding on some trailers Uh private trailers that were apparently may have been used sometimes in animal control work, But they were not owned by the parish.”

All four of the employees reportedly resigned rather than face termination by the parish.

In 2014, the pound killed approximately 63% of the animals in its care.  The only other online statistics I could find were from 2011 when the pound killed 60% of its dogs and 85% of its cats, according to a local volunteer group.  The group has a page detailing the thousands of pets needlessly killed each year at the pound along with all the standard excuses about how there aren’t enough homes, they “have to” kill every single day of the year, the irresponsible public blows, killing isn’t as much fun as it should be and smack in the middle, in boldface, is this:

ouachita parish enablers

Screengrab from a PAWS of NE LA webpage.

Oof.

So apparently this institutionalized killing for convenience has been going on for years, maybe since the pound’s inception, I don’t know, and it’s a total package complete with a band of enablers.  The director and staff don’t do their jobs to shelter animals but kill them instead while the volunteers stand ready to defend the killing and blame the public.  Maybe no one has ever done their jobs at this place, I don’t know.

But recently, “someone within the animal shelter” was moved to take action.  Not because the place is an epic fail and the bodies are really starting to pile up, not because there are proven alternatives which could be put into place to save the animals but continue to be ignored in favor of daily kill-fests – but because somebody got a grill built by an inmate.  And there was WELDING.

Enough is enough, you know?  I mean killing animals hand over fist every day of the year instead of doing our jobs is one thing but getting a grill made and having welding on some trailers Uh private trailers that were apparently may have been used sometimes in animal control work, But they were not owned by the parish – well that’s just objectionable.  There comes a time in every man’s life when he’s got to take a stand and this is that time.

But do not fear, the mission endures:

[A]lthough down four employees, Robinson says it hasn’t seriously affected the shelter.
[…]
“Our treasurer office has kind of taking over the day to day operations as far as the financial and the money and things that go on.”

Things that go on. I dread to think.

(Thanks Clarice for the links.)

NM Shelter Killing 10 Dogs a Day for Convenience

KOB in New Mexico reports that the Valencia Co Animal Shelter is overcrowded with more than 240 dogs at the facility. In response, they are killing for convenience:

This week, the shelter has killed 8-10 dogs every single day and even that’s not nearly enough.
“I can’t bring myself to putting 40 to 50 dogs on that list at a time like I should be,” [supervisor Patty Mugan] said. “We’re getting to that point when we’re going to need to.”

Not need to – choose to. Killing is a choice, as is lifesaving, which is hard work:

“It’s not fair to the kennel techs to have to have twice the work to do to clean and walk dogs and feed them and everything else,” Mugan said.

I’m sorry but where in life do we sign up for FAIR? Because I have been wanting FAIR so hard all these years and I’ve never known where I go to get it. Is it Valencia Co, NM?

And the response to UNfair is kill, I guess.

“But it’s sure not fair to the animal sitting in a crate on borrowed time. It’s very hard for us mentally to watch day after day.”
[…]
“It’s not easy to be the one to look in their eyes and tell them goodbye,” she said.

Where does this sense of entitlement come from?  Life should be fair and easy and not require ironing.

I’m glad it’s not easy to kill animals you are supposed to be sheltering. It should be hard. It should be impossible really.

Staff is apparently trying to ship the problem out of state by getting rescue groups to transport dogs.  But since every state in the U.S. kills shelter animals, shipping shelter pets to other states is not a long term solution.  It just redistributes the killing.  Maybe that seems fair or easier to some people, I don’t know.

Instead of killing animals and making excuses for it, why not try implementing the proven programs of the No Kill Equation?  Start looking the animals entrusted to your care in the eyes and telling them hello.  Tell them you are committed to protecting them from harm and getting them into loving homes.  It requires hard work but seeing all your animals get out alive sounds pretty sweet.

(Thanks Clarice for the link.)

Scott Co Pound, So Killy

scott co wjhl

Screengrab from the WJHL website showing puppies at the Scott Co pound.

Volunteers at Scott Co Animal Control in Gate City, Virginia are speaking out against the needless killing of dogs at the facility and the staff’s failure to work with rescues. But surprise! – only joking, there isn’t any surprise:

News channel 11 spoke with the Scott County Animal Control today and they say they’re not doing anything wrong.
[…]
Jake Dougherty works at Scott County Animal Control and he said they are following procedure. He said, “the required amount of time that we have to keep [animals] is 7 days if they don’t have a collar. If they have a collar, we have to keep them 10 days.”

In addition to following procedure, Scott Co AC is functioning primarily as a pet killing facility where 65% of the animals are killed. Volunteers say that sometimes adopters inquire about a pet only to be told the dog was already killed. So why can’t slack-ass adopters get on the ball sooner and get down to the pet killing facility to adopt while the dogs are still alive? Maybe it’s the hours, which the county’s website (which shows zero dogs for adoption) states are 8 – 12 Monday through Saturday.

Dougherty says additional staff would help. He said, “If we had a full-time employee … that would, I’m sure, double our chances of people coming in to see what we’ve got.”

Star light, star bright,
The first star I see tonight;
I wish I may, I wish I might,
Have the wish I wish tonight.

Gosh, if only Dougherty’s wish could come true, the dogs would have double the chance!

Scott County Animal Control actually already has 2 full-time employees, including Dougherty, along with one part-time employee.

Oh. So the dogs already have what – quintuple the chance of staying alive but are still being killed at a rate of 65%?  But IF there is room and IF someone wants them, Dougherty says dogs might be allowed to live beyond the 7 days – up to a month even.  Gee whiz!  *kisses ring*  Except when they aren’t:

Volunteers, like Billy Denton, said that just last month animals at Scott County Animal Control Shelter were killed too soon.
Denton said they’ve got “21 kennels there and there were twelve dogs at the shelter and 6 dogs were euthanized.”

Oh. Well anyway ho, hum:

Dougherty says euthanizing animals is part of the job. He said, “You have to distance yourself a little bit from the animals.”
“I can’t look at them the way that everyone else does because you’re not going to find homes for every animal,” He said.

So the dogs are killed by someone who doesn’t look at them like other human beings do because he considers killing them to be his job. That puts a swell image in mind for every poor dog who draws his last breath at the Scott Co pound.

One thing you can’t fault him on though is his logic. It’s absolutely correct that you are not going to find homes for every animal when you’re only open for 4 hours a day, sit around pining for a full time employee when you are one of the full time employees, don’t work with rescues, don’t market your dogs and don’t regard dogs like everyone else does.  And you definitely aren’t going to find homes for dead dogs, which is what you make most of your live dogs into, because you think it’s your job.

Maybe he should distance himself further.  Like to Mars.

(Thanks Clarice for the link.)

Shawnee Pound Gasses 3 Dogs Because It Can

The animals at the long troubled gassing pound in Shawnee, OK have been getting some help from area rescuers.  With a paltry 48 hour holding period, rescuers must continually scramble to get pets out alive.  They have reportedly been able to pull every dog at the small pound since May.  But that streak ended last week when the city gassed three dogs, one of whom was reportedly slated to be pulled that morning.  Tragically, the public outcry is being directed at the former owners (who may or may not be known) instead of those who actually killed the animals.

The Shawnee city manager, Justin Erickson, says the pound will, at some unspecified time, stop gassing and start killing via injection.  He plans to talk more about that next year.  Cause I mean, what’s the hurry, right? As for embracing the proven programs used by hundreds of open admission no kill shelters around the country, that’s a no:

“We are not able to transition to no kill at this time,” said Erickson during Monday’s city council meeting.

I assume that explanation will satisfy everyone paying for the shelter to not shelter animals.  If not, maybe local animal advocates can stop dreaming up Evil Former Owner fantasies and start pressuring public officials to do their jobs.  Or just let the city keep rescuers in continual crisis mode, with them gassing the occasional pet because they can, and enabling them by failing to unequivocally blame those doing the killing.  The more the city is able to distract advocates, the more things stay the same.

Let’s be clear:  Some shelter pets are lost.  Their owners want them back.  Others are in between homes.  It doesn’t matter who used to own a shelter pet or how that animal arrived at the shelter.  There is only now.  Now is an opportunity to help the animal, starting with protecting his right to live.  Everything else is a distraction.

(Thanks Clarice.)

Nevada Pound Director Avoids Felony Charges, Enabled by Police Chief

As we are often chided by those opposed to hearing the truth about pet killing facilities, nobody wants to kill animals.  And this is true, with the exception of everybody who does want to kill animals, especially those who pee their pants a little every time a box of Fatal Plus arrives in the mail:

Jenny Silvia, a shelter volunteer, told police […] that [former Boulder City Animal Control Supervisor Mary Jo] Frazier “finds joy in killing animals.”

Police were talking to people who had worked with Frazier at the pound while they conducted an investigation into allegations of needless animal killings by Frazier:

A frantic phone call [in April] had prompted a Boulder City police detective to investigate whether the city’s head of animal control had, just for fun, been killing animals in the city’s shelter.

[…]

Boulder City Animal Control Officer Ann Inabnitt told police that Frazier, her supervisor, didn’t want to provide medical care to Lotus, an abused 11-week-old pit bull suffering from shattered teeth, a swollen head and a broken left hip. Frazier’s reason, her co-worker told police, was “we don’t spend money on pit bulls and because I’m just going to stick her anyway,” according to the detective’s affidavit to support an arrest warrant. […] Frazier refused to put the pit bull on the veterinarian-recommended diet of soft food, records show.

The police investigation reportedly found that Frazier had personally killed approximately half the animals who were impounded by Boulder City AC since being promoted to supervisor in 2006.  She instructed staff not to advertise animals for adoption online.  The Boulder City pound was never at capacity and animals were killed while cages sat empty.

Most of the animals who were killed by Frazier were killed upon impound, in violation of the city ordinance requiring a 5 day holding period.  Another city ordinance requires an exam by a veterinarian before any animal is killed but police determined Frazier was routinely violating that law too.

After Frazier’s husband divorced her crazy ass, he says she stole his dachshund, took him to the pound and killed him.

The police investigation culminated in the issue of an arrest warrant on felony and gross misdemeanor charges against Frazier – a warrant that was never served because the chief of police, who is in charge of the pound, quashed the whole thing.  Frazier retired two days later.  She is apparently collecting retirement checks from the city and has skipped town, probably to a place where they have drinks with little umbrellas in them.  Little umbrellas that look like needles filled with Fatal Plus, I’m guessing.

Police Chief Bill Conger defended sweeping the whole thing under a rug:

The chief said that he himself showed Boulder City Attorney David Olsen the investigation and that Olsen said felony charges would not stick, though “maybe a couple of misdemeanors” would.
“Why go forward with something that’s not going to go very far, number one, and number two, when she resigned this whole thing stopped,” Conger said.

A leetle problem:  the city attorney says he never heard word one from Conger about the case.

Another teensy snag:  After an area paper published the story about how Frazier was allowed to get her rocks off by needlessly killing animals on the taxpayers’ dime then retire before she could be arrested, take the taxpayers’ money and go someplace sunny, taxpayers were displeased.  They began an online campaign, held a protest at the police station and generally raised hell.

In response, the police chief decided he’d kick the ball down the field a little, then fall on the pile after the opponent was tackled to make it look like he was trying:

Boulder City officials have reversed course, saying they will submit previously dismissed information from a criminal investigation of the city’s former animal control supervisor to the Clark County District Attorney’s office for review.

As far as Conger’s role in enabling Frazier’s escape from justice:

“People get in trouble and resign all the time,” the chief said Tuesday.

Chief of Meh.

Also:  don’t criticize, we all want the same thing, if you don’t volunteer at your local pet killing facility you are part of the problem, blahcetera.

rooster

(Photo by Casey Post.)

(Thanks Clarice and Jan.)

 

Clark Co Kills Pets Just Fine, Doesn’t Need Do-Gooders Saving Any of Them

The most recent statistics on the Clark Co Animal Control website are not too recent.  In the fiscal year 2010 – 2011, the pound took in 10,181 dogs, killing 5099 of them.  Las Vegas tv news station KTNV reported yesterday that “almost 14,000 animals” were killed in Clark Co last year.  Regardless of the exact number currently being killed, it’s obviously steep.

One bright spot:  The county has partnered with local veterinarian Chris Yach for decades.  Dr. Yach saves animals the county can not afford to treat:

As part of his long-standing private practice, Doc Yach provided emergency care for sick and injured animals brought to him by Clark County Animal Control.
Often going out-of-pocket to provide extra care beyond what the county could cover.
“And we loved to. It was kind of one of those things we could do to give back,” Dr. Yach said.

The county reportedly keeps careful track of all animals taken to contracted vets in case their owners are searching for them.  After nursing the animals back to health, Dr. Yach would find homes for unclaimed animals.  It’s a partnership that has reportedly saved many pets whose injuries would have landed them on the kill list at the pound.  But the county has decided the terms of the long standing agreement with Dr. Yach are no longer acceptable.  It’s not about money, it’s about control:

“And for whatever reason, the county decided that we can’t [adopt out animals] anymore,” Dr. Yach said. “It has to — no matter what, it has to go back to the pound — even if we can find a home for it.”
[…]
“If we can find one home, let alone dozens of homes for these pets, we’re gonna probably find a better home than the pound,” said Dr. Yach. “And the pound has so many animals to find homes for, why would it make any difference that we found a home for this pet here?”

The county pound is killing thousands of animals a year but is now demanding they get even more pets into the facility.  How does this make sense?

[County Animal Control Administrator Jason] Allswang says they have to follow protocol.
“The code reads that the animals have to go to the contracted shelter.”

But since the county has no “shelter” – just a pet killing facility – maybe they could just keep on letting this vet save some animals here and there?  Since it’s no extra work or expense for the county?  All they have to do is nothing and boom – some animals get to live.  But I guess that’s just ridiculous.  Maybe you have to kill 14,000 animals a year to really appreciate the importance of following the county code to the letter.

(Thank you Clarice for the link.)

Perry, OK Asplains Pile of Dead Dogs Behind Pound

After photos of dirty kennels and decomposing dog carcasses behind the pound in Perry, Oklahoma were posted on social media, area residents were outraged.  The Perry ACO explained to the local news that he normally buries the dogs killed at the pound but the hole digging thingy broke so he had to use a pit to toss the bodies in and wait until the pit was full before covering it over.  Also:  he took the job to “help animals”.

Not to be outdone, the city manager issued the following statement:

There have been some disturbing and disgusting photos from the City of Perry’s animal shelter posted on Facebook, the worst being dead dogs in various states of decomposition. I want to assure Perry residents that the these conditions are being addressed.

For the last several months, the city of Perry has been working with a group of local volunteers to improve the conditions at the shelter. This volunteer group is now organized as the Perry Humane Society, and their concern for humane treatment of animals is to be commended. Their willingness to be part of the solution in addressing issues at the shelter is very welcome. With the help of city funding, private donations, and volunteer time and effort, an addition to the existing animal shelter building is under construction. When the addition in completed, there will be runs to allow the animals to go in and out of the building and will be a major improvement over what we have now.

The City of Perry encourages responsible pet ownership. Unfortunately that isn’t always the case. When Animal Control picks up animals, their goal is to reunite animals with their owners or find new responsible owners. Euthanizing animals is done as a last resort and is handled by a local veterinarian. As I understand the procedure, two injections are given. One to sedate the animal and the second to put it to sleep. It is done as humanely as possible, but is not a pleasant part of their job.

The City has been exploring alternatives to disposing of euthanized animals. I was contacted by the city of Stillwater about a month ago offering Perry their old incinerator that is due to be replaced. We will evaluate its condition and whether it is a viable and cost-effective alternative. Other alternatives for disposing of euthanized animals are also being discussed.

The Perry Humane Society has also been assisting Animal Control by helping advertise animals at the shelter available for adoption. Animal Control has also been releasing animals to the Humane Society that are available for adoption to responsible owners instead of having to be euthanized. Unfortunately, not all dogs are good candidates to be released for adoption. Because of the liability that the City of Perry bears for animals that are released to someone other than their owner, we use our best judgment and a lot depends on the age of the animal. If we err, it is going to be on the side of caution.

My message today is to let Perry citizens know that the City of Perry has been addressing the conditions at the Animal Control Shelter and will continue that effort with the help and involvement of the Perry Humane Society.

So basically:

  • There’s going to be a new addition to the killhole.  (New things fix everything, even lack of compassion!)
  • The public is irresponsible.
  • The homeless animals are killed humanely, probably.
  • The city might start incinerating dead pets instead of leaving them out back to rot, if it’s cheap enough.  If not, they’ll find some other cheap way to get rid of the bodies.  Because there are gonna be bodies.  Lots.
  • The city is letting rescuers save some dogs but is refusing to allow other dogs a chance to live, based mainly upon age.  If the city makes a mistake in its most excellent judgment (on age, I guess), better to kill an animal than risk allowing him to live and uh, age.
  • Everything’s fine, move along.

Welp, totes reassured over here.  Sounds like the experts are ON IT.

(Thanks Clarice for the links.)

Two TN Pound Directors Kill 379 Cats with Colds in One Month, Remind Public to Spay-Neuter

The Kingsport Animal Shelter reportedly killed 103 cats in response to an upper respiratory virus at the facility last month. At the neighboring Washington County – Johnson City Animal Shelter, 276 cats were killed. Killing cats for having colds is inexcusable. But the directors of both facilities seem to be rather non-chalant about all the violence:

“276 cats, it’s a lot of cats in one month in fact one is too many,” said Washington County Johnson City Animal Shelter Director Debbie Dobbs.
[…]
“The cats come in sick, and once they come in sick then they contaminate the other cats that are here also,” said Sullivan County Bluff City Kingsport Animal Shelter Operations Manager Donna Davidson.

If that’s the case then that’s on you.  Your job is to humanely shelter pets which for cats includes proper cage disinfection, stress reduction protocols, vaccination prior to or immediately upon intake and appropriate housing, including isolation for sick animals.  If you were doing your job then cats who come in sick would not infect every other cat in the shelter.  And just because you are failing to prevent mass outbreaks of disease does not give you carte blanche to use mass killing as a response.

More nonsense:

Dobbs and Davidson said the best thing cat owners can do to help fight the virus is spay and neuter pet cats which will help limit overcrowding (a huge factor in spreading the virus in the shelters).

It’s true that overcrowding makes it more likely that a virus will spread in a shelter but hullo – the pair of you just killed 379 sneezing cats and I see no indication of an intent to change practices.  The locals spaying and neutering their pets is a good thing but it will do nothing to save the cats caged in your slaughterhouse right now.  Only you can do that by doing your jobs.

Having a look at the Washington County – Johnson City pound’s webpage detailing its adoption policies, and it’s got all the awful.  The second sentence:

If you are interested in breeding or have personal doubts about sterilization, you are looking for a pet in the wrong place.

Gee, how welcoming.

Next up is the price list where they outline that in addition to the $20 adoption fee, adopters must pay for the cost of the neuter surgery.  If the pet you want to adopt is already neutered, you have to pay a $15 penalty.  Because I don’t know.  Oh and if you choose a dog who is about to give birth, they will spay her, kill the puppies and charge you extra.  They don’t give vaccines either.

But anyway, it’s just a mountain of dead cats and cats come in sick and whaddaya gonna do – except spay and neuter of course.

(Thanks Clarice for the links.)

Mitchell Co Kills Pets Slated for Rescue

A statement from the Mitchell Co Correctional Institute in Georgia indicates an adoption rate of just 21% at the pound and reads, in part:

On September 1, in accordance with its policies and procedures, Mitchell County Animal Control was regretfully forced to reduce the population of stray animals in its custody in order to maintain humane conditions within its capacity limitations. The County’s priority is to find homes for these animals as often as possible. However, with limited resources to house the constantly growing number of stray or forfeited animals, the County has no choice but to control the population.

Some of the dogs killed by Mitchell Co on September 1, as posted on Facebook.

Some of the dogs killed by Mitchell Co on September 1, as posted on Facebook.

Translation: On September 1, Mitchell Co killed 25 dogs and 22 cats – nearly every animal in the facility, including many who were slated for rescue:

“There was animals that were put down that were promised to be safe and to come in and see the furnace going was devastating,” said [pound volunteer Kathy] Harrell.

Imagine volunteering for a shelter and walking in to care for the animals you are helping to get rescued only to find them in the fucking furnace.

Apparently Ms. Harrell is one of the lucky ones allowed to help shelter staff do the jobs they aren’t doing.  Other rescuers have reportedly been turned away:

Janet Goree says her efforts to help get animals adopted from Animal Control have been denied.

“We are all volunteers that want to see this happen, but the Animal Control won’t let us help,” said Goree. “The doors are firmly shut in our face.”

An adoption rate of 21%, killing animals rescuers are willing to save, turning away volunteers – it doesn’t look like Mitchell Co is doing the best they can, as we so often hear from killing apologists.

To be fair, I took a look at the facility’s website to see how they market animals.  It directed me to this page to see the available pets:

mitchell co 1

Screengrab from the Mitchell Co website on September 9, 2015.

Screengrab from the Mitchell Co website on September 9, 2015.

Just in case this half-assed effort for two dogs (or halves of two dogs) wasn’t the only effort being put forth by the county, I went back to Google and found this page:

Screengrab from Mitchell Co website on September 9, 2015.

Screengrab from Mitchell Co website on September 9, 2015.

Now true, they only have one dog advertised here, and she’s from 4 years ago, but how about a round of applause for managing to upload the entire photo?  Finding homes for shelter pets is clearly a “priority” for the county.  And they are “regretfully forced” to kill animals, whom they haven’t marketed and whom rescuers are willing to take.  But nobody wants to kill animals.  That would be like, evil.

(Thanks Clarice for the links.)

ID Shelter Conducting Mass Cat Killing Due to Upper Respiratory Infection

Emily, one of 52 cats from a hoarding case taken in with a URI by the SPCA.

Emily, one of 52 cats from a hoarding case taken in with a URI by the Medina Co SPCA in Ohio.  (Photo by Casey Post)

When some cats at the Pocatello Animal Shelter in Idaho got sick last month, the shelter tried treating them for one week, then conducted lab tests.  The results showed an upper respiratory infection caused by the feline herpes virus and a mycoplasma infection.  After consulting with local vets, shelter officials decided to kill the entire population of cats – approximately 100 pets.

“It’s like a really nasty cold,” said [Pocatello Public Information Officer Logan] McDougall. “You have sneezing, you have coughing, eventually you have a high grade fever, and ultimately it can lead to dehydration and death.”

It can lead to death.  Which means it can also lead to life.  You know what definitely always 100% absolutely leads to death?  Killing.

“It wasn’t an easy decision to make. It was something that took a lot of thought, and decided this was the best course of action for all the animals of Pocatello.”

Can we poll the cats on that?

Officials say it wasn’t cost effective to try and treat the cats because their survival is very slim even with treatment.

So some would have survived with treatment but dollars.  And issuing a plea to the public for donations to cover the cost of treatment sounds like work.  So, best course of action is to kill the sick cats, the asymptomatic cats, even the cats in foster homes:

Logan McDougall […] said some of the cats have already been put down and others are still being returned from foster homes.

Emily, after being treated at the Medina Co SPCA.  Her vision is permanently impaired but her desire to be held and loved is perfectly intact.  (Photo by Casey Post)

Emily, after being treated for her URI at the Medina Co SPCA in Ohio. Her vision is permanently impaired but her desire to be held and loved is perfectly intact. (Photo by Casey Post)

Imagine fostering a cat for the Pocatello Animal Shelter and receiving a call to bring in your cat – not because there is a potential adopter who wants to meet her – but to be killed.  Even if she doesn’t have any signs of illness.  Because we’re killing ALL THE CATS.  Sign me up for that foster list.

I hope local animal advocates are taking action.  The cats clearly have no voice at the shelter.

(Thanks Clarice and Anne for the links.)

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