MO Police Chief Shoots Caged Pet


Chase, as pictured on Facebook.

Elizabeth Womack and her family recently moved to a home in Sparta, MO.  When her mixed breed dog Chase went missing on November 10, she immediately began searching for him.  After getting the runaround from Sparta police chief Andrew Spencer for a week, Ms. Womack was finally given Chase’s dead body along with a story of what happened.

Spencer said the day Chase got out of his yard, someone had called 911 to report a dog charging at residents. He described the dog as aggressive, a claim the owner disputes:

“The only reason our dog would charge at anybody would be to play,” says Womack, “He was just such a playful little pup. He had no aggression. He didn’t know what that was.”

With the aid of a citizen and a chokepole, Spencer reportedly lured Chase into a crate.  City ordinance required Spencer to then take the dog to a veterinary facility for a 5 day holding period and to post the pet’s description at city hall so the owner could find him.  Instead Spencer took Chase to a shooting range and shot the caged pet to death.

Spencer says he had contacted a shelter and was told they wouldn’t accept the dog.  And that he had received another call about a rollover car wreck and needed to respond to that right away so he didn’t have time to secure housing for Chase.  He only had enough time to drive to the shooting range and kill the pet before responding to the rollover accident, apparently.  I’d hate to be the injured driver hanging upside down by my seat belt, waiting on Spencer to get finished playing Big Man Shoot Dog in Box.

Ms. Womack says that she should have been contacted via Chase’s microchip information.  You know microchips, the things municipal employees always wave in our faces every time they kill an owned pet who didn’t have one.  If only you would have microchipped your animal, everything would be ok.

After much public outcry, Spencer, who has been in law enforcement only three years, was placed on paid leave a few hours prior to the Sparta Board of Aldermen meeting on November 24 where a large crowd was expected.

Ms. Womack and approximately 100 supporters attended the city meeting seeking justice.  Sparta has a pitbull ban in place and the subject of discrimination based on body shape came up at the meeting:

State Rep. Lynn Morris also attended the meeting, saying that he thinks there is an issue of profiling animals, in this case, a pit bull.
“A person who could be mean or kill an animal doesn’t need to be a person who takes care of people,” Morris said, which was followed by applause. “People that are cruel to animals are cruel to people.”

Speakers at the meeting asked for charges against Spencer and sought changes to prevent this from happening to another family.  I hope the city replaces the breed ban with a sensible ordinance based upon a dog’s actions – not how fat his head might be.  Good for Ms. Womack and local residents for standing up and making their voices heard.

(Thanks Clarice.)

Cat Needlessly Suffers at Fort Bend Co Pound

A004477 cage cardThe failing Fort Bend Co pound in Texas has claimed another victim.  Cat ID #A004477 was impounded as a stray on October 7, 2015.  On that date, his records show he received a vaccine and his condition was listed as “normal”:

Portion of medical records for cat ID #A004477 at Fort Bend Co.

Portion of medical records for cat ID #A004477 at Fort Bend Co.

At some unknown point, the cat’s condition became abnormal. What is known is that on October 29, animal advocate Elizabeth Welch was at the Fort Bend Co facility pulling a litter of kittens for a rescue group when she noticed cat ID #A004477 was sick. She notified 2 staff members who were in the room that the cat had diarrhea and needed to be seen by a vet.

On November 2, volunteer Taylor Cook found the cat limp, gasping for air, his body and cage covered in diarrhea with kittens housed below him. She alerted staff to the cat’s condition and snapped this photo:

Cat ID #A004477 at the Fort Bend Co pound. (Photo by Taylor Cook)

Cat ID #A004477 at the Fort Bend Co pound. (Photo by Taylor Cook)

Staff killed the suffering cat, later named Gabriel by a volunteer, and listed his condition as “severe”.

Records from Fort Bend Co, obtained via FOIA request, show that after the initial vaccination at time of impound, the cat was never treated again. No observations were recorded at any time. No notation was ever made that he was sick nor did he receive any vet care. He appears to have suffered, nearly to death, for at least 4 days while staff cashed their paychecks.

When outraged animal advocates complained to the county about the needless suffering and death of Gabriel, they all received the same form letter in response. The letter is basically the county patting itself on the back for all its “achievements” at the pound and refers to “marked improvement in the live release rate”, “a veterinarian walk through twice weekly” and donations earmarked for vet care for sick animals. And:

In addition to the improvements noted above, the staff has implemented a new schedule of monitoring all cages and all animals by senior staff three times each day. This is in addition to the usual walk-throughs by staff as they clean and feed the animals. This increased vigilance will assist the staff in identifying illness or other issues that can be promptly dealt with either by shelter staff or the volunteer community through their donations to rescues or 501(c)3 organizations. As always, we also appreciate volunteers and other visitors pointing out concerns as they see them to staff at the shelter at the time of their visit.

I interpret this letter to indicate that senior staff failed to note Gabriel’s desperate condition 3 times a day for at least 4 days. That’s 12 fails right there. Staff failed to note Gabriel’s deterioration every day during feeding and cleaning. More fails. And it seems logical to speculate there would have been at least one vet walk-through during those 4 critical days where no notes were made about Gabriel dying in his cage. Another fail.

But the county appreciates the public “pointing out concerns as they see them to staff” – so they can do nothing, apparently. Well staff did manage one note in the records – to list Gabriel’s condition as “severe” at the time they killed him. Gotta keep that marked improvement in the live release rate. Remember: euthanasia to relieve suffering is a kindness and we can’t blame staff. They’re doing the best they can, we’re all on the same team, blah cetera. I wonder how many other kindnesses Fort Bend Co has doled out to pets whose conditions are listed as “severe”.

(Thank you Elizabeth and Taylor for information in this post.)

Clark Co Kills Pets Just Fine, Doesn’t Need Do-Gooders Saving Any of Them

The most recent statistics on the Clark Co Animal Control website are not too recent.  In the fiscal year 2010 – 2011, the pound took in 10,181 dogs, killing 5099 of them.  Las Vegas tv news station KTNV reported yesterday that “almost 14,000 animals” were killed in Clark Co last year.  Regardless of the exact number currently being killed, it’s obviously steep.

One bright spot:  The county has partnered with local veterinarian Chris Yach for decades.  Dr. Yach saves animals the county can not afford to treat:

As part of his long-standing private practice, Doc Yach provided emergency care for sick and injured animals brought to him by Clark County Animal Control.
Often going out-of-pocket to provide extra care beyond what the county could cover.
“And we loved to. It was kind of one of those things we could do to give back,” Dr. Yach said.

The county reportedly keeps careful track of all animals taken to contracted vets in case their owners are searching for them.  After nursing the animals back to health, Dr. Yach would find homes for unclaimed animals.  It’s a partnership that has reportedly saved many pets whose injuries would have landed them on the kill list at the pound.  But the county has decided the terms of the long standing agreement with Dr. Yach are no longer acceptable.  It’s not about money, it’s about control:

“And for whatever reason, the county decided that we can’t [adopt out animals] anymore,” Dr. Yach said. “It has to — no matter what, it has to go back to the pound — even if we can find a home for it.”
“If we can find one home, let alone dozens of homes for these pets, we’re gonna probably find a better home than the pound,” said Dr. Yach. “And the pound has so many animals to find homes for, why would it make any difference that we found a home for this pet here?”

The county pound is killing thousands of animals a year but is now demanding they get even more pets into the facility.  How does this make sense?

[County Animal Control Administrator Jason] Allswang says they have to follow protocol.
“The code reads that the animals have to go to the contracted shelter.”

But since the county has no “shelter” – just a pet killing facility – maybe they could just keep on letting this vet save some animals here and there?  Since it’s no extra work or expense for the county?  All they have to do is nothing and boom – some animals get to live.  But I guess that’s just ridiculous.  Maybe you have to kill 14,000 animals a year to really appreciate the importance of following the county code to the letter.

(Thank you Clarice for the link.)

Florida Dog Bite Statute May Be Ruled Unconstitutional Today Due to Mandatory Killing Aspect

Padi, as pictured on Facebook.

Padi, as pictured on Facebook.

Florida veterinarian Paul Gartenberg performed surgery on a stray dog who had a rusty chain embedded in his neck.  Although his intention was to find a home for the dog, he ended up falling in love with him so made the dog part of his family.  He named him Padi, due to the padlock on the embedded chain he was dragging when found.

Padi came to work every day with his owner and was beloved by hundreds of clients at the vet clinic.  In June, a 4 year old boy was interacting with Padi at the clinic.  At some point, Padi attempted to hide under a desk but the boy reportedly followed him into the tight space, lunged at the dog, and Padi bit off the child’s earlobe.  Padi was seized by Manatee Co Animal Services for killing:

The state’s “Damage By Dogs” statute says that a dog that bites a person without provocation is to be “immediately confiscated by an animal control authority, placed in quarantine, if necessary, for the proper length of time, or impounded and held for 10 business days after the owner is given written notification, and thereafter destroyed in an expeditious and humane manner.”

Dr. Gartenberg hired an attorney to fight in court for Padi’s right to live. After 11 weeks, Dr. Gartenberg received permission from the court to bring Padi home from the pound.  But the legal battle has continued, with Padi gaining support from many animal activists.

The legal argument being made on behalf of Padi is that the Florida statute requiring automatic killing is unconstitutional as it robs the owner of his due process – that is, a chance to offer a defense by explaining to a judge the circumstances of the bite.  There is a hearing scheduled in Manatee Co for this afternoon at 2:00 during which the judge could decide that the statute is unconstitutional.  In that case, Padi would be allowed to live.  State legislators are already working on amending the law.

San Diego Co Pound Volunteers Go Public with Concerns

Dog ID #1683976 pictured on the County of San Diego Animal Services website.

Dog ID #1683976 pictured on the County of San Diego Animal Services website.

More than a dozen current and former volunteers with the County of San Diego Animal Services recently shared some concerns with The San Diego Union-Tribune. Among the volunteers’ complaints are needless killings, poor conditions, and retaliation against volunteers who speak out. The allegations mirror some of those made in lawsuits filed by former vets at the facility.

Former pound volunteer Bonnie Kutch quit after years of service and now volunteers with a different shelter. She says of the county pound:

“They were euthanizing perfectly good dogs to make space for other dogs coming in, and not devoting enough effort to getting the existing dogs adopted,” she said.

Additional problems noted by the group of vols:

Not only are officials too quick to put down pets, volunteers say, they resist practices that could lead to more adoptions, such as opening on Sundays like many shelters do so more animals can be adopted out at a time convenient to the public.

The volunteers say many shelter animals languish in cages for days or even weeks at a time without walks, making them “kennel crazy” and lessening their chance to be adopted.

Vols who asked if they could walk dogs say they were told to wash dishes instead or were kicked out.

Longtime pound director Dawn Danielson killsplained all the things to the Union-Tribune, including claiming that the county has maintained a 0% kill rate for dogs deemed healthy and friendly for the past 6 years. (Never you mind about the 6600 pets killed last year. They were all unhealthy and unfriendly, it says so right here in this note I just typed.) And as for those pesky vols wanting to get dogs out of their cages for walks, this ain’t no doggie day spa:

“It’s nice to get the dogs out, but it’s not required,” Danielson said. “We want them to be able to urinate and defecate in their kennels” because it helps prevent infections.

Right. Ask anyone in the business of trying to prevent infections. They’ll tell you the first thing you want to do is shit on the floor you eat off of.  That’s Hygiene 101 right there.

She said her priority with adoptable dogs is to promote “kennel enrichment,” spending quiet time with the animals inside their cages so they learn to be calm when potential adopters arrive.

Quiet time – good one.  I imagine the line to sign up for squeezing into cages with unexercised shelter dogs so they can jump on you with their poopy paws while pleading “Let me OUT!” in the most dramatic way they can manage is probably super long.  Any vols still have their front teeth?

Anyway, the director isn’t asking for much:

“All we ask of our volunteers is to follow the rules and to work with us and follow our philosophy.”

The philosophy apparently being Suck.  And Kill.  And also Suck.  Who wouldn’t want to get on board with that?

(Thanks Clarice and Teresa for the link.)

Memphis Pound Fails to List Animals Online for 10 Days

Screenshot of the last 4 dogs listed on the MAS PetHarbor website, taken October 29, 2015.

Screenshot of the last 4 dogs listed on the MAS PetHarbor website, taken October 29, 2015.

Screenshot of the last 4 cats listed on the MAS PetHarbor website, taken October 29, 2015.

Screenshot of the last 4 cats listed on the MAS PetHarbor website, taken October 29, 2015.

Animal advocates are concerned that once again, Memphis Animal Services is not updating the only online listings the city does for animals at the facility:  PetHarbor.  These listings, while far from ideal, are essential since MAS has limited hours, limited services, and lots of locked doors where animals are hidden from view.  In some cases, the online listing is the only way for anyone to know an animal is being kept at the facility.  As usual, MAS director James Rogers blames technical difficulties and wants everyone to please stand by:

From: Lou Ann Selves
Sent: Tuesday, October 27, 2015 3:06 PM
To: Rogers, James; Tunstall, DeKeishia Masha; Dunlap, Tracy
Subject: Pet Harbor

PetHarbor shows the last dogs that came into the shelter were on October 19. No dogs have been brought in since that date or has no one updated? Considering review dates are critical, some have a small chance of getting out of there if their info is not available.

Lou Ann Selves


On Tue, Oct 27, 2015 at 3:41 PM, <> wrote:
Good afternoon Lou Ann,

We are aware of the issue and working with our IS department and Chameleon customer service to correct. Your patience is appreciated.

Thank you

James M. Rogers
Administrator, MAS


From: Lou Ann Selves
Sent: Tuesday, October 27, 2015 3:54 PM
To: Rogers, James
Cc: Tunstall, DeKeishia Masha; Dunlap, Tracy
Subject: Re: Pet Harbor

How will this “issue” affect the animals’ review dates who are coming into the shelter and have no chance to be posted to PetHarbor?


From: <>
Date: Tue, Oct 27, 2015 at 3:55 PM
Subject: RE: Pet Harbor
To: Louann Selves

MAS will adjust accordingly. Thanks

Adjust accordingly. So MAS has been no kill for 10 days or… erm, something else?  The animals must really be piling up.  MAS might finally have to use all those brand new cages that have been collecting dust since the place opened.  Or not – video of the Puppy(less) Room at MAS taken this week by Jody Fisher:

So where are all the animals who have been impounded by MAS over the last 10 days?  Where are all the animals whose review dates have been adjusted in order to compensate for the city’s failure to list them online so they can be reclaimed, rescued or adopted?  Why does MAS have so many technical difficulties using PetHarbor?  Is PetHarbor designed for rocket scientist use only?  I reached out to Chameleon for comment last time MAS was blaming the company for the failure to post photos of animals (not very long ago) but no one responded.  Hopefully they are more responsive to their customers who have com-pew-tor problems.  Ten days is an awfully long time to leave animals’ lives hanging in the balance – if in fact any are actually still alive.

Detroit Animal Control Being Sued by Everybody

Warning:  There are disturbing images at the links.


ACO Brittany Roberts has filed a whistleblower lawsuit against Detroit Animal Control after she says she was fired in September for advocating for the animals in the facility.  Ms. Roberts says she saw seriously injured pets impounded and left to suffer without vet care until they died.  One dog who had been hit by a car was left in a wheelbarrow at the pound for days.  The wheelbarrow is normally used to transport dead bodies to the freezer.

In interviews with local media, Ms. Roberts said the dogs were never walked and were forced to live in their own waste.  Illness was rampant throughout the facility and she often saw healthy animals become sick very quickly.  Many animals died in their cages from illness or starvation.  Workers would walk around the facility each morning to count the number of animals that had survived the night.  Those still alive would get food thrown onto the feces and urine covered floors of their cages.

Ms. Roberts was appalled at the cruelty she observed but says no one in a position of leadership would listen to her concerns.  After she began documenting the inhumane practices, she was fired.

Among the other allegations made in the lawsuit:

  • Pets were not scanned for microchips.
  • Sick animals were housed with healthy animals.
  • Animals were cramped into cages which were too small for them.
  • A litter of six orphaned pups was impounded and the director refused to release them to rescue or allow another mama dog to nurse them.  They slowly starved to death.
  • A 7 pound dog was hanged in a chokepole by the neck while an ACO carried the pole around the facility.

The whistleblower lawsuit is just one of many currently filed against Detroit Animal Control.  Several owners whose dogs were impounded due to lack of licenses have also filed lawsuits.  The dogs are held at the pound until the owner can produce proof of ownership deemed acceptable by DAC and pay the penalty fees which accrue daily.  One owner says he was visiting from South Carolina when DAC took his dogs away for lack of Michigan licenses.  Another says her two dogs were licensed but she couldn’t produce the documentation to prove it so her dogs were impounded.  Both got sick at DAC and one died.

Then there’s this bit of say whaaaaa:

That brings us back to [pound director] Harry Ward. He also has a dog being held in the shelter. His 6-year-old Mastiff, Peaches, lives in the shelter, but he’s not paying the daily fees.

“It makes you want to do a better job with everybody’s dog, when you know that your dog is here too.” Ward said

Peaches will not be adopted out to a home, and will continue living in her cage. All the while, her food, room, and board is all being paid for by taxpayers.

And if you don’t like them apples, I guess you know, so what.

The city’s response to the lawsuits and allegations was initially uh, hide but when that failed to make the situation go away, they tried announcing that the pound will now super generously allow other groups besides the scammy Michigan Inhumane to pull animals.  So come on down to DAC and grab yerself some sick animals out the wheelbarrow to take to your vet for expensive treatment.  Just remember not to take the director’s dog.  Because she lives there.  Because I don’t know.

(Thanks Clarice for the links.)

A Sense of Belonging

Some of you may remember the story of a Boston man who was walking his dog in January when he was struck by a school bus.  The dog was killed and the man was seriously injured.  Many people were touched by the tragedy and the students on the bus were met by counselors when they finally arrived at school that day.

Today, the Boston Globe reported the rest of the story including background on the man, Jeff Schwartz, his dog Buddy, and the numerous obstacles Jeff has faced since losing his leg in the accident.  You might be tempted to skip the article for fear of it being too depressing but I would encourage everyone to read it.  It is a harrowing tale to be sure but it is peppered throughout with inspiration and hope, revolving around the special bond we share with our pets.

Pets are so many things to us.  Pets are our motivation to battle adversity, our source of comfort, and our sense of home.  When Jeff awoke from his month-long coma, he was unable to speak but could hold a pen, although writing was difficult.  He wrote down two questions for his wife who was at his bedside:

Where do we live, and did Buddy survive?

In that moment, Jeff’s sense of home was so limited that he could not even remember where he lived.  But he remembered Buddy.  Perhaps it was because memories can be dodgy in patients who awake from a coma but possibly there was something more at play:  a house is a physical structure which keeps the wind off, a pet is part of your identity.  A missing limb can be inquired about later.  Pets are family.  We belong.

Due to the physical limitations and setbacks which occurred during Jeff’s lengthy recovery, he was unable to care for a new dog as soon as he wanted one.  Amidst progress and despite the challenges, he and his wife recently decided to go ahead and adopt a dog from an area rescue which pulls pets from southern pounds.  Her name is Mandy.  Jeff has a walking partner again.  And so much more.

Mandy is reportedly shy and doesn’t like most men.  She would make a likely candidate for killing at many pounds based on those traits alone.  Or she might have been killed for space or because her mandatory holding period had expired or any other arbitrary reason.  But it is Mandy’s natural birthright to live.  And it was her destiny to help provide a sense of identity to Jeff.

For anyone working in a so-called shelter to violate Mandy’s right to live and rob her of her destiny should be a crime.  Instead it’s standard operating procedure at far too many public facilities.  That needs to change.  Lives are at risk – precious lives of all varieties interwoven with one another.  The fact that these needless killings are happening by the millions each year diminishes our collective identity.  The sense of loss is palpable.  What is needed though, in spite of the horror, is for it to be motivational too.  Start here.

Florida Animal Advocates Ask State Officials to Investigate Putnam Co Pound

A group of 12 shelter animal advocates in Florida sent a letter to the governor and the state attorney general requesting an investigation of Putnam Co Animal Control for animal cruelty and other illegal acts.  Among the allegations made in the letter:

  • Animals are left to suffer in cages without treatment for serious injuries and illnesses.  Some of them have suffered to death.
  • Animals are killed via “cruel and barbaric methods” including heartstick without sedation.
  • Dogs are left in the cages while they are being pressure washed.
  • ACOs have taken pets from their yards and listed them as stray.
  • Animals are not scanned for microchips upon intake.
  • Microchipped/tagged animals are “routinely” killed without ever contacting the owners.
  • Friendly animals are labeled aggressive and killed.
  • Animals who have rescues or adopters on the way are killed.
  • Animals are killed while cages sit empty.
  • Sick animals are not isolated and the facility is not properly cleaned on a daily basis.
  • Donated vaccines were left untouched in the refrigerator until they expired while county officials claimed that consistent vaccination upon intake has not been possible due to lack of vaccines.
  • Repeated offers of veterinary care from various members of the community have been refused.
  • Donated medicine and equipment have gone unused.

The letter specifically mentions that previous efforts to address the issues on a local level have failed.  It sounds like at least one local official has read the complaint and swiftly issued a meh:

Brian Hammons, the director of Putnam County planning and development services who oversee the animal shelter says it has received the letter and had no plans on acting on it. And had no further comment.

I am not a public official so maybe I’ve got this all wrong buuuut:  If I received a letter signed by 12 of my constituents alleging criminal acts being committed on a daily basis at a facility I’m in charge of, I’d be inclined to say something to the media that at least gave the impression I was vaguely concerned.  Even if I wasn’t.  Even if I had zero intention of performing due diligence and was content to let the alleged criminal acts continue unchecked.  Even if my only action plan in response to the letter was to fold it up and use it as a coaster for my coffee, I do believe I’d try to avoid letting on about that publicly.  Just to keep my job maybe.  Or is Brian Hammons the One True King of Putnam Co?

(Thanks to everyone who sent me this story.)

Orange Co Shelter Director Intent on Killing Service Dog

Karma, a service dog trained to help with PTSD, as shown on the Orang Co Register website.

Karma, a service dog trained to help with PTSD, as shown on the Orange Co Register website.

An Orange County Superior Court judge ruled this month that a service dog named Karma must be killed at the Orange Co shelter in CA before October 20. The ruling was based upon the recommendation of the shelter’s director/veterinarian:

OC Animal Care Director and Chief Veterinarian Jennifer Hawkins has deemed the husky mix too dangerous to be released in the community or to live at an animal sanctuary. OC Animal Care designated Karma a vicious animal because the dog killed at least one cat in 2012 in Anaheim, and because of the dog’s partial wolf ancestry, the effectiveness of required rabies vaccinations is unknown.

The “partial wolf ancestry” being referenced:

Animal Care ordered a genetic test on the dog – the first ever by the agency – after her owners were arrested and family members told police the dog was part wolf. The genetic test suggested that Karma likely had a wolf ancestor two or three generations back.

Suggested? Gee, that sounds… inconclusive. To complicate matters further, the CA Veterinary Medical Association says:

The California Department of Health Services (CDHS) requires that if an animal contains any wolf, even 1 percent, it must be considered a wolf hybrid and handled as an exotic animal. The California Department of Fish and Game, however, only requires a permit for the animal if it is 50 percent or more wolf. According to CDHS, a veterinarian can vaccinate the animal with canine rabies vaccine, but if it bites someone or is bitten by a rabid animal, it will be treated as unvaccinated.
The AVMA Trust cautions veterinarians to inform owners that the vaccine is not licensed for use in wolf hybrids, and no studies have proven efficacy of the vaccine in the animals.

It appears that in CA, owners of any animal designated a wolf hybrid run the risk of having the animal ordered killed if the animal bites a person or is exposed to a rabid animal due to the unknown efficacy of rabies vaccine on hybrids. But as far as I can tell, Karma has neither bitten a person nor has she been exposed to a rabid animal. It’s unclear to me why the OC shelter director is recommending she be killed.

Orange Co Supervisor Todd Spitzer also questioned the director’s recommendation and asked the Board of Supervisors to override the director at a hearing this week:

Spitzer argued that a liability release drafted by county lawyers Friday and approved by OC Animal Care outlining the requirements of how Karma must be kept should be enough to spare the dog from death.

But Hawkins would not relent:

“I stand by my recommendation that euthanasia is a reasonable means to assure public safety,” Hawkins said during the Board of Supervisors meeting. “I don’t know if it will distinguish between domestic animals or a small child.”

Oh geez. So let’s kill the dog because the director doesn’t understand canine behavior and can’t predict the future. Sounds like solid reasoning. Spitzer was apparently caught off guard:

“When county counsel gave me a draft of what it would take, I believed, mistakenly, she supported that,” Spitzer said. “I had no idea even if a rescue (group) signed the agreement she would not support it. The fate rested in the board’s hands. We’re the only ones who have the authority to overrule the recommendation of our Animal Care director.”

Spitzer was the only board member advocating for Karma’s right to live. None of the other members were willing to support Spitzer. The wolf sanctuary that originally agreed to take Karma backed out. Because Karma is a dog. There are reportedly several other rescues willing to take her. But it sounds as if the OC shelter director is committed to killing Karma, despite all offers and all reason. I dread to think how the director applies her form of logic to saving – or ending – the lives of other pets at the shelter.

(Thanks Kellee for the link.)


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