Foster Pet of the Day

Submitted by reader Terri who writes:

Miss Bea is a eight-ish year old border collie mix with a touch of chow (the tongue doesn’t lie).  She came to us after a national group did a rescue at a local hoarder.  Miss Bea was at their temporary shelter when she started to give birth and they asked us to put out a call for a foster home.  The ease with which Miss Bea raised her puppies leads us to believe this was not her first litter; thankfully it is her last, and we were pleased to be able to help her raise these puppies in luxury.

Despite an old injury from being hit by a car, Miss Bea was apparently a dominant force in the pack of dogs at the hoarder home.  However, she has settled in quite nicely at my house and gets along with all of the dogs we have exposed her to-dominant as well as submissive.  She is smart and just wily enough to make you smile.  Miss Bea is not trustworthy around cats or chickens, and in a small household she would probably be ornery to the other dogs when it came to food.  She is not food aggressive around me or my dogs but I am a strong pack leader.

Miss Bea comes fully vetted and is heartworm negative.  We would transport her for the right home (after arranging a home visit).

We would love to find a forever home for this sweet dog.  I think she could be happy in many different situations-as a companion for an older person or as a partner for someone who hikes. She will be an active dog for many years to come.  Don’t let that grey muzzle fool you-this girl ain’t no granny.

Please contact Terri at homewardboundofms@gmail.com

The Homeward Bound Project of MS is a 501(c)(3) organization started and run by vet students at Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine.  Since 2007 we have coordinated the transport of Mississippi shelter pets to no-kill shelters in New York and New Hampshire.  All shelter pets are fully vaccinated, altered, heartworm tested negative (or treated) and have been in foster care.  Our transported pets do not displace local dogs; most are adopted within 2 weeks of arrival and the increased traffic often results in local shelter pets being adopted as well.

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5 Comments

  1. citydog

     /  May 27, 2012

    Lots of breeds have tongue pigmentation, not just Chows. :)

    http://www.chowwelfare.com/cciw/blacktongue.htm

    Reply
  2. Tip Burrows

     /  May 27, 2012

    Beautiful dog! I would remove the comment about part chow – that scares off many adopters and I would not think chow by looking at her. Many breeds have black tongues other than chows, and black spots on a tongue is simply pigmentation not any kind of breed indicator!

    Reply
  3. Lisa in OH

     /  May 27, 2012

    I was just going to post about the tongue issue. Here are a couple of links to a wwebsite I assist with. The first is about the black tongue debate and the 2nd is instructions for building elevated dog beds. We make tons of these for rural shelters in Ohio

    http://www.columbusdogconnection.com/BlackTongueDebate.htm

    http://www.columbusdogconnection.com/elevated_dog_beds.htm

    Reply
  4. This sounds just like our Sheba, who passed over the rainbow bridge some years ago. She was lab and chow, lab with people, chow with other dogs. Loved cats! Our last female was elkhound and husky, with a little wolf. We would be happy to have this girl but as we are on the west coast of Canada, too far away to be able to take her. We hope she finds a forever home.

    Reply

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